Not enough fingers and toes to count the queen cells

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Sep 17, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    My neighbor has caught 4 small swarms in the last week around hi bee yard. I have looked through all 14 of my hives and not seen
    any signs of swarming. Then he looked through one of his double deeps and found these. Thats the most queen cells I have ever seen
    on one frame. And there were other on other frames.

    Do you think these small swarms have been casting from this five. It's like it,s spring time around here.

    20130917_184948.jpg
     

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  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    My guess would be those are afterswarms. Nice pictures. :coolphotos:
     

  3. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    What makes a colony do this? Why are these queens that hatch not acting normal and killing the rest of queens and coming back like usual?

    What should we do now? Tear out all these QC accept for maybe 2 or 3?
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I don't honestly know why some colonies issue afterswarms and others do not. I usually nick off most of the cells, leaving 2 or 3 of what I consider to be the best. Some here don't agree with that believing the bees know which is the best.
     
  5. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I had a hive like that a few months ago. I removed 2 of the cells and started a nuc and left dozens in the hive. That hived swarmed themselves to death I believe.
    Another really strong hive did it last month with 8-12 cells on 3 different frames. I removed 2 frames and re-queened weaker hives/nucs and that hive has recovered nicely.