Notification of Spraying by Farmers

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by Hobie, Mar 9, 2010.

  1. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Are farmers required to notify area beekeepers when they spray their fields?

    Even if not, has anyone ever approached a farmer asking to be notified? I have spoken with the owner of the neighboring land (a shrub nursery) in the past, and they are agreeable in a big-company, absent-minded sort of way. Sometimes they call at 10 am and say they will be out in an hour, that kind of thing. Sometimes they call, and never show up to spray.

    The reason I ask is that the nearest fields are now in shrubs again, after several years of corn and oats. Shrubs are heavily sprayed for beetles, etc., and I worry that it may be the end of my beekeeping. (If the hives are poisoned, I will not get more until I move.) I was thinking of sending a formal letter, but not sure of the wording. I don't want to be antagonistic.

    If hives are poisoned, do beekeepers have any recourse?
     
  2. wfuavenger

    wfuavenger New Member

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  3. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Depends on your State laws. Here in Indiana, there's an online map (http://www.driftwatch.org) where I can register my bee yards (or other "sensitive" areas) and applicators are strongly "encouraged" to check before spraying. Beyond that, if my bees are killed by a pesticide spray, there is recourse available via the State chemist's office, and if the applicator didn't follow label directions precisely, he can be held liable.

    Recently, a few other upper-midwest states have joined in the "driftwatch" campaign.