Number of bees for mated queen???

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by w_baker76, May 23, 2012.

  1. w_baker76

    w_baker76 New Member

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    I was thinking of getting a few bred queens, But Im not sure how many bees each queen would need in a small nuc to make it work. Can anyone help me with this?


    Thanks
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Most folks use 4 or 5 frames of bees, brood, honey, and pollen.
     

  3. w_baker76

    w_baker76 New Member

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    Well thats good to know. I thought it might be like starting with a package of bees. Did not think they would need the brood to start.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    OK. A 2 lb. package is about 7000 bees. A 3 lb. about 10,500. That what you looking for?
     
  5. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    As an experiment I did it with a frame of brood covered in bees and a frame of stores covered in bees and 3 frames of foundation. That was on March 20th. It is doing really well.
     
  6. w_baker76

    w_baker76 New Member

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    I am looking at using a mini nuc with five small frames. It wont hold a lot of bees.
     
  7. cheezer32

    cheezer32 New Member

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    Most mini mating nucs are stocked with 8 oz. or about a coffee cup full of bees and have the spae equivilant of 1.5 medium frames, or often 1 medium frame and a small feeder. If you are planning on holding the queen for awhile I would look into something larger, possible 1 frame of brood and adhearing in a 5, 8, or 10 frame box with the rest being foundation; they will slowely grow into the box giving you extra resources and not forcing you to come in every week and remove frames to prevent swarming or overcrowding issues. It is basically what Eddy Honey said, it is also a great way to make late summer/fall splits to overwinter and have queens and increase hives for the following year.
     
  8. w_baker76

    w_baker76 New Member

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    Thanks to all for the info. All has been a lot of help.