Observation Hives

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by brendantm130, Feb 11, 2011.

  1. brendantm130

    brendantm130 New Member

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    How long can you keep bees in an observation hive? I guess it would depend on the design.
     
  2. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

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    I assume a closed OB hive? Not sure but I would think no more than a couple days. After that they'll start eating eggs and the donor hive the queen came from is going to get into serious emergency supercedure mode. The higher the temp the more this is true.
     

  3. brendantm130

    brendantm130 New Member

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    If it wasn't a closed hive? Sized like a nuc?
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    a observation hive is far harder to keep alive than a regular hive. One managed right can last several years but you got to keep on top of it. I have taken ob hives to fairs and had them closed up for up to 4 days with no noticable problems. But doing so You got to give them lots of ventilation and I put water in the feeder. I also put a fan at the entrance blowing up into the hive
     
  5. charmd2

    charmd2 New Member

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    I am installing an 8 frame this spring and expect to let it go as long as it decides to live. With proper entrances and exits of course. I think I read somewhere for a long term observation hive you need at least 3 deep frames or the equivalent.. someone correct me if I am wrong.
     
  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Charmd2 I would say that would be the minimum my ob hive has 2 deep and 2 shallow. By the way i dont have it up and running but I am hoping to have it going this spring from a swarm or a split. The problem I got into was my entrance and exit from the house was to long and got clogged up with dead bees and was unaware of the problem until it was to late. It was late fall and figured the numbers in the hive was dropping as the old field bees died off little did I know they wasnt getting them out of the hive. My Bad
     
  7. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

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  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Wow. I love the office hive. I assume it can be closed up and taken outside to work it when necessary (difficult?). How long is that run from the hive to the top of that pipe on the outside?
    Very nice, it would almost be enough to make me want to go to work! :mrgreen:
     
  9. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

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    Thanks. It sits on pegs so all you have to do is lift it and comes off. The entrance is closed by a sliding door when the tube is pulled out. It's a little heavy but that's mostly because of the 3/16 plate glass, but it's pretty easy to work. It's tippy if there's any wind so you've got to be careful or wait for a better day. I only work it when it's getting overcrowded (remove frames of stores and or capped brood) or if there's a problem. Otherwise I can see what's going on so there's not need to get in there. It was last winters project and I've truly enjoyed being able to see what's going on through the winter. The pipe length is about 10 to 12 feet long. Well more than is recommended but I wanted to make sure the flight path is well above the sidewalk. I set it up to look like a vent pipe and when the sappling in front grows up it will create more of a visual barrier and force the foragers a little higher.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    dcoates adds this link..
    http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Ul ... info/U501/

    tecumseh:
    a shoe box observation hive. I built one of these and it is handy to take into schools and such. the basic plan allows you to drop the one frame into the bottom of the box fairly quickly which means it's shelf life in much enhanced.
     
  11. DOrr

    DOrr New Member

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    I'm glad the OB worked out for you Drew. I had almost forgot about that monster! Building that OB was a challenge. I like your entrance there. http://s196.photobucket.com/albums/aa19 ... on%20Hive/
     
  12. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

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    Indeed that's the one you made. I ended up adding a few things, beefing up the door hinges (the glass was too heavy), had to widen the grooves for the glass as they were 1/32 wider than the channels cut (my mis-measurement), enlarged the exit/entrance, added lift handles, added the glass covers, added an autoclose entrance/exit, and making the whole hinge system was more of a challenge than I initially thought. I've enjoyed it quite a bit and it was well worth the price.