October surprise: no capped honey or brood

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by jesse.rizzo, Oct 11, 2015.

  1. jesse.rizzo

    jesse.rizzo New Member

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    Just checked my hive for the last time before winter, and find that there is no capped honey at all. There's some uncapped, but not much, maybe like 5 frames were partially filled with uncapped honey. There were also no brood capped or uncapped. That might be normal for this time of year in Missouri. I also had a lot of hive beetles. I obviously will have to feed through winter, any thing else I can do to increase survival odds? Any ideas what happened? I didn't notice lots of chewed up cappings that might indicate robbing.

    This was a new hive from a nuc this year. They were booming most of the summer, I had a like 8 deep frames of honey in June.
     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    The queen stops laying when there is no flow, feed feed feed and do something about the beetles. The beetle sheets work, so do beetle traps with olive oil. Start syrup 2:1 now if your weather is warm enough, and make some fondant for winter they will absolutely need it.
     

  3. jesse.rizzo

    jesse.rizzo New Member

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    Thanks. Yeah I already made up some sugar syrup and refilled my beetle traps. How often do people empty those traps?
     
  4. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    If you have a LOT of beetles maybe once a week.
     
  5. jesse.rizzo

    jesse.rizzo New Member

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    While I had the hive open for feeding I noticed some different bees hanging around the entrance, wrestling with my girls. So I reduced the entrance to a few inches. I'll feed all winter of course, and hopefully they make it.

    Although, should I be concerned that my queen was looking killed by robbers? I've never been good at spotting her, so I might not find out until it's too late.
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    1. Robbers don't usually single out the queen for killing so if you had her before the robbing started, she's most likely still around.
    2. You don't need to see the queen to know she's around----look for eggs or young brood and if you see them, you have your answer. Believe me, it's a lot easier to check for the queen by seeing eggs than by finding her. they don't hide or change position like she does.
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'll second efmesch on this one. Feed feed feed and close your opening down to a one inch and half height if you want, it will make it easier for your small hive to defend itself, as long as one or 2 bees can get in and out at the same time. There isn't a lot of foraging going on in winter but there is a LOT of robbing on nice days
     
  8. LizzeB

    LizzeB New Member

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    I agree with emish....but, I say all these signs add up to a hive that is going down. I think they swarmed and the new queen was not a success or never was a new one. The hive beetle is telling you that there is an absence of bees....soon wax moth will tell you the same. Just my prediction. Sorry