Odd happenings at today's inspection

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Bens-Bees, May 11, 2010.

  1. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    I inspected my apiary today and found a couple of odd things... first was one of my new hives that was from the cutout had abandoned a frame of brood (the one I put in there for them to make a queen from just in case the queen didn't survive the bee vac... there's a few capped worker cells and the rest have just been left to rot (they're the little black ones in the pictures)

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    I've never seen them abandon brood like that... the only reason that I can think that they would have abandoned it is because I did get the queen... that much I know because I found her here...

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    Anyway, I was a little surprised to find that all my colonies have queens... that was a happy finding. :yahoo: Also found that my big hive is just about to swarm on me, and while I thought they hadn't laid any eggs in the mediums because the ones closest to the deep frames they usually use for brood didn't have any, but the very next frames over did have some, and capped queen cells to boot. Yayy, I have my donor frames for the trapouts now... one went with me to the latest trapout, the other I'll go back and add to the other trapout tomorrow perhaps... hopefully it's not too late for them.
     
  2. BeeSavers

    BeeSavers New Member

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    Perhaps they didn't have enough bees to take care of the brood?
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Maybe the brood got chilled before you put it into the hive for them to cover?!?! Just a thought.

    G3
     
  4. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    The brood had bees on it originally so it stayed covered... I also noticed a small pile of dead bees on the top of the frames... I can only guess that the cutout bees killed the bees that came from the other hive on the brood frame, then abandoned the brood... or some such thing.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I think BeeSaver has it right. The second picture kind of suggest this directly. There was not enough labor force to feed the larvae on that frame.

    I see this fairly commonly in making up nucs and using queen cells. Normally I cell the nuc as they are being made up and on which frames the bees in the box decides to cluster is somewhat random. Invariable you place a queen cell between two frames only to come back later and find the cluster has moved to the other side of the box.