odd hive shapes

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by 2kooldad, Feb 13, 2013.

  1. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    I've read about diffrent box configurations in some of my older bee books...im only refering to lanstroth frams...ive read about them making long boxes that werw kinds like top bar hives...just squar with frames an long...up to 20 frames or more...in a wall or tree the bees hang long, not very wide, comb that becomes attached to the wall of the hive verticly...has anybody pas:t or present ever tryed a boc that was really tall....say two or three feet high with regjlar frames that are just tall
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Bees are conformist they adapt to the space that they find themselves in. When Langstroth invented the modern hive which is in no way ever been standardized to a single design. What he did invent was the standard frame which allowed for the bee space, was removable, so to allow the hive to be managed and manipulated. The size of the supers designed by Langstroth was not necessary the optimal size for the bees, but conformed to the dimensional size of the lumber used to build the supers to construct the hive. Bees in nature do not build horizontal divisions between the honey and brood But as beekeepers we want to separate and remove the honey so having multiple stacking boxes makes this practicable. In most modern stackable hives the standard Lanstroth frame length is used, which determines the supper length. How many frames are placed in the supers and the height of the frame is the varying factor. The bees preferring one setup over another is subjective and are based on the beekeepers preference for lighter hives, frame area for maximum brood production, total height of the hive, stability of the hive from blowing over.
    In the end we have to consider the manageability of the hive we decide to keep the bees in.
     

  3. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    When i first started bee keeping i read alot of books so i could get as much info as possible before i started. All of my books were old (from the early 1900's) and all written by bee keepers from up north. I read about Dadent and his experiments with box/frame sizes for brood boxs. Basicly what i took from it was that he found the 10 frame deep to be the optimal size for the brood chamber. Double deeps were a good choice for winter clusters because the bees could move up through the second deep as they consumed their winter stores and medium supers were placed on top for honey production during the flow. This setup is usualy what I see when I see pictures of other peoples hives. Now that i have been doing this for a few years ive seen and heard about lots of diffrent setups. I dont live where it gets cold, nor do we have short and furious flows here like they do up north, but there is no "bee book of the south". Given that I am not bound by the same restrictions as northern beeks, like winter and short flows, i wonder sometimes what new or old things i can try. Obviously i have to be concerned with pest/diesease so things like skeps and bee gums (illeagle anyways) arent on the table, but other things like long boxes and top bar hives (which i have not heard of people making frames for but cannot belive for a second someone hasnt tried it) interest me. I cant make a bee do anything she wont do, but i like to convince them to give new things a try. id like to know what off the wall things people have tried an why they did or didnt work for them.
     
  4. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    One interesting thing that I recall reading is that langstroth made his original hives out of wine boxes and the dimensions he used stuck. Personally I find it extremely annoying that Lang frames are still designed for lumber that hasn't been in production for over 50 years. Modern 2x10 lumber comes in 9.25" widths and everything is designed around 9.5" boxes.

    As far as different box sizes, I'm a fit construction worker and I find a full deep super at about the limit what I can lift and handle smoothly. I definitely would not want to try anything bigger.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I can recall pistolpete folks tossing full deeps of honey on the back of a 5 ton truck flat bed and then someone else stacking these 5 boxes high on the truck..... and doing this pretty much all day long. bee keeping work is easy right?

    an Apis snip..
    The bees preferring one setup over another is subjective and are based on the beekeepers preference for lighter hives, frame area for maximum brood production, total height of the hive, stability of the hive from blowing over.

    tecumseh..
    well stated.... of course if you are trying to sell a particular kind of hives you just tag these subjective preferences as 'more natural' and you (or at least I am) always amazed at how many folks will fall for that simple trick.
     
  6. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    A square box woudl make since to me. This way all 4 sides could be made exactly the same. The final dimensions could be based upon some multiple 1/8. 1/8 etc of todays lumber dimensions. One of the biggest problems with improving the hive is that there are already so many out there and nearly every person relies on that compatibility factor. I think that if beekeeping set up one hive and it remained one hive you would see hundreds if not thousands of variations on the beehive.
     
  7. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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  8. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    old bee hive.PNG 20 frame dadent hive.PNG a long hive.PNG dadent an langstroth.PNG to tall for me.PNG auto truck.PNG these are some of the pics I was first intraduced to an what got me going into beekeeping...lol...an auto truck...if they only knew.