Oh, why couldn't they have waited 2 more days.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by heinleinfan, May 10, 2012.

  1. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    Well, I didn't see it. I didn't hear anything from our downstairs neighbor, who's window is right there and he's always observant, didn't have any neighbors calling or freaking out, never saw pre-swarm gathering...

    ...but I went in today and yup, my super productive hive went ahead and swarmed. I did two splits from this hive and stuck an empty super on there to try to give them more space; I even emailed around that I'd be willing to barter or sell a split out of it, I got no takers and just could not get my hands on another box before this weekend, and payday. *sigh*

    They must have ninja-swarmed some time on Tuesday. I was in the garden all day. I thought they were looking less populated the past couple of days, but my husband thought I was being swarm paranoid. Heh.

    My hive is still full, it's got a nice population, they just aren't completely jam packed in there anymore, so I know it's likely for the best.

    There were about 4 frames still with capped worker brood, and a few uncapped cells around. I saw 1 mite on one bee in the entire inspection, none in any uncapped cells, and that's the first mite I've seen all year, so I'm not worried about that. I did not see any additional swarm queen cells being built.

    I did see 4 empty queen cells, along the bottom of a frame. I did not spot a queen at all, despite pouring over all 30 frames.
    I know, rationally, that there is a high probability they have a queen; the cells were there, both my splits raised queens just fine, and I know she's likely be too small to have been seen today, and it will be a while before I can expect to see her laying.

    Irrationally, of course, I'll be worrying myself silly the next few days that they've gone queenless, because worrying is what I do. *sigh*

    My only real concern is that I do have entirely too many drones now. What was a "pretty good" percentage of drones is now "too many" after the swarm. I pulled the two deep frames that had the largest patches of drone brood, all capped, and cut those out, so hopefully their population will decline over the next couple of weeks. I also cut out some patches of empty drone cells, I'm hoping the ladies will repair it back into worker cells. I did leave some capped and uncapped drones in there though, I don't want my new queen to feel lonely when she's ready for some action!


    I plan on going in there about a week from now, see if I can spot the queen or some eggs.


    Go forth, super productive queen, and I wish your new colony well!
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If you find 15 swarm cells and make 15 splits using cells, the queen will STILL swarm. The only way a split helps with swarming is to remove the queen with the split.