OK so go figure????

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by barry42001, Jul 7, 2012.

  1. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I inspected the 5 hives in Middleburg, including the one that I noted a fully drawn supercedure cell with larvae, could find the queen, OK.
    When I looked yesterday ( ohh by the way was 97 with full bee suit, and gloves uggh! ), The Supercedure was opened in the side a oval ragged hole, so I know what happened or thought I did till I found the "old" queen, clipped and marked unless they are mutant bees that hatch out with blue dots on their thorax, and clipped wings. Any idea what happened--would a laying queen let the workers make and develope queen cells minus a swarming impulse? If so why did she destroy that one.
    Barry
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    kind of answered your own question..........eh?:wink:
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If you seen plans being made to murder you, wouldn't you take measures to stop it.:lol: Jack
     
  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    lol Jack I guess I would, hmm but would that include several traitorous workers that sought to bring the upstart into existence to begin with....hang em high
     
  5. CharlieB

    CharlieB New Member

    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I had a supercedure queen hatch with mom still running around inside the hive. I found them both on the same frame. I asked Dewey Caron about it and he said it's common for the workers to let the mom live until the new queen mates. I asked why mom doesn't kill her and he said sometimes they do, but most of the time they go along with it. Weird!
     
  6. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    judging from the jagged hole in the side of the cell, even though the cell was open on top with a round opening, I do believe the soon to be queen was destroyed by the parent queen.
    Barry
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I suspect barry what you describe is much more common that some folks might think. I myself have inadvertently created the same kind of situation (ie the production of a superscedure cells) in small nucs with a perfectly acceptable queen on board. all you need do is place a very small number of eggs outside the primary cluster area and on occasions the bees isolated on that one frame will begin rearing queen cells. sometime the older queen finds the cell prior to hatching and sometime not. you can accomplish pretty much the same thing with a queen excluder by placing eggs on both sides of the excluder (but only sometimes). I would think doing either of these is somewhat a function of the quantity of bees in the box and the queens pheromone production (the first factor being somewhat easy to observe and the second purely speculative).
     
  8. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    was on outside frame in small to moderate sized colony.
    Barry
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    that is typically where I find them here. quite often times in 5 frame medium depth nuc box with smallish population. almost alway the 'idiot beekeeper I employ' (this of course being myself) inadvertently flipped the outermost frame on the prior inspection and did not notice a very small circle of eggs.... which is invariable is where the cell is constructed.

    unless the queen cells are right together I have never seen them make more than one cell in this circumstance.