OK, What's Next?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by litefoot, May 31, 2012.

  1. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    I'm a new-bee. I installed a package about six weeks ago and have been doing weekly inspections since then. On my last inspection of the brood box, I see that about 6 1/2 of the frames are fully drawn out and there are lots of empty cells from emerged brood that are now reloaded with eggs. I also see newly capped brood and capped nectar stores throughout. I saw very little in the way of pollen stores which has me a bit concerned.

    Anyway, I built and added another deep brood chamber. Things seem to be OK, other than the pollen concern. Moving forward, what do I need to look for in the next weeks/months as I inspect the hive and how often is "too often" to be opening things up. Thanks! The more I do this the more I realize how little I know.
     
  2. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    every 2 weeks usual for inspections and as for the pollen if your area has alot of flowering going on the field worker numbers should be going up soon, at 6 weeks after install your at the start of the new hatching and as more hatch out the field force will go up, I would think the bees are using up pollen almost as fast as it come in at the moment.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    you have started from a package so from the get go there are NO food reserves in the box. To reinforce this since there are no cells drawn even if there were excess pollen coming in when you stared the hive there would be no place to store it anyway. Pollen hoarding can also be somewhat seasonal in nature (for some reason they seem to go crazy collecting the stuff in the fall of the year). Also how much accumulates in a hive may be directly impacted by feeding... that is any feeding the encourages brood rearing also consumes significant quantities of pollen.

    By watching the field force at the hive's front entry and closely noting these girl's pollen baskets you can tell quite easily if you have significant pollen coming into a hive.
     
  4. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    litefoot,
    checks every 7 days with a hive started from a package, and i check my hives every 7 days anyway package or not, so i can get in front of any problems if there are any, and to tec's post.