okay the rat has to come clean

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by riverrat, Nov 14, 2010.

  1. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Believe it or not I still havent pulled honey. Now heres my theory its cooled down here bees are going into cluster at night and slow during the daylight. They should be clustered down on the brood. I am may pull next weekend depending on how fast i recover from surgery. I saw jerry brown pull honey one year in the snow Jerry is a nephew to the adees honey empire. So I think this will work if they are clustered down on the brood On a cool day I can remove the honey bring it home turn the heat up in the garage for a couple days and extract. Dont have a lot to pull since this year was a split and build year. I know this isnt the best plan but about my only choice. I got to pull it soon before they move up thru the exluders leaving the queen behind. Thought I would post this to show what happens when you get to many irons in the fire and you get burned :beg:
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    They will work from the bottom up. If they get to the excluder this early, what will they eat in Feb. if you take the honey? They won't have any left.
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Im planning on checking them friday if I can take the honey and still leave them enough i will do so I didnt have them supered with more than one and some stronger 2 if they are light i will pull the queen excluder and leave the supers
     
  4. Tyro

    Tyro Member

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    Up here - many beekeepers use that exact strategy. Mostly I think because it starts getting cold so early. The trick is to make sure you leave enough for the bees (as Iddee pointed out).
     
  5. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    The other option is just forget about it until spring. You can always take what's left in spring, although some of it may be crystallized. Might be easier on all of you (you and the bees) given all you've had going on this year.

    I ended up doing this unintentionally 2 years ago when both my hives starved despite the fact that there was a whole super of honey just inches away.

    (Lesson learned: It does not help to put a super of honey on in the fall if the existing hive does not have capped honey all the way to the top.)
     
  6. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    You'd be removing the excluders in either case, right?
     
  7. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Yes if you don't the cluster will move up into the honey stores above the excluder leaving the queen behind to die.
     
  8. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    As I have posted several times previously, is my belief that leaving the bees to keep whatever they collect after the primary nectar flow is best for a few reasons.
    1.) atleast from my perspective, the fall flows tend to be both spotty and of a far poorer quality then the spring and early summer flows. If conditions are right the fall flow can rival the spring flows, but seldom does.
    2.) while harvesting the honey brings in more money, and I understand that syrup is cheaper then what you can get for honey,again is my belief that is what they were designed to metabolize best so is what I leave them.
    Again is my thoughts on the overwintering bee with honey--and leave them atleast 60 pounds.
    Barry
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I have heard many old timers say that fall honey is poor quailty honey? But i think the bees know more about that than i do,besides i've never seen a bee spit it out. :mrgreen: Jack
     
  10. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    LOL at no time did I suggest that the honey was unfit for the bees to consume, on the contrary I am suggesting that is good for the bees to keep :drinks:
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    from what I have read about 20 to 22 kg is the magic number. then add an insurance buffer for early spring brood up and the number would closely approximate Barry's number.

    for an average size hive I like to leave at least 50 pounds and then do some stimulative feeding during the very late winter/early spring. the more bees I need come spring splitting time the more of the latter I plan to do. A not insignificant benefit of stimulative feeding is that even in the poorest of years I tend to capture a bit of a honey crop.
     
  12. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Looks like it will be a couple more weeks I got a 15lb weight limit for at least 2 weeks going to con the kids into helping get it off or the queen excluders pulled this weekend