on the spot queens

Discussion in 'Raising Queens' started by jb63, Jul 22, 2012.

  1. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    I have read about ots queen making,but I've never actually done it.I'm not lazy but I do move towards the path of least resistance.So what I did was find the queen.Got lucky on the third frame.Put her and the frame in a nuc.Pulled another frame of capped brood and added that to the nuc.When I got home I added two frames of honey and one more brood from a gentle hive.
    Then I found some eggs.My eyes aren't as good as they used to be so some of it was guessing when I broke down the cell walls to half way.I think I did ten or twelve cells ,so we'll see what happens. From what I can tell now I wait 10 days and then check for cells.How did I do Omie?
    caucasions 001.jpg caucasions 002.jpg caucasions 003.jpg
     
  2. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I have to be honest and say it looks a bit haphazard (sorry!)- I'm not sure which cells you intended to be the ones with the pulled-down bottom wall.
    When I did this last year, I tried it on about 12 different cells- mostly with tiny new larvae that I figured were about two days old after eggs hatched. I think they may have been considered too old by the bees...I now think doing this with mere eggs is better.
    The 'good' news is that I suspect the bees will just do what they want anyway. The second time I did the cell cuttin gthing, they only made 1 QC on the whole frame anyway. Yet in another hive recently I just kidnapped the queen and didn't do anything else and the bees made about FIFTEEN queen cells altogether on various frames...! Go figure. lol!

    Here's the photo from the mdasplitter.com site where it talks about the cell wall cutting:
    http://www.mdasplitter.com/pics/batched/600/homepic_notching.jpg
    But even that seems a bit messy with the clunky hive tool. I'd rather use a very small pointy sharp knife and delicately pull the bottom wall down without making a big mess.
    But these days I seem to have more luck just letting the bees do it themselves, so I don't know!
    I'm sure you'll get some QCs either way. :)
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I tried this last year and the bees repaired the torn down cell walls and pulled queen cells elsewhere.
     
  4. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    I dont bother with this, I just move a frame up above the honey barrier that has eggs in the center and in a week I have cells, it has worked perfect 4 times in a row (4th time now even wanting it done) just watch for the frame that has the football shape brood in the middle with stores around the outside to be fresh laid in and move it right away all your cells are now in the middle of the frame for easy cutting out.
     
  5. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Thx Omie and Zoo and 3G.Zoo do you use an excluder along with the honey barrier ?Omie I was trying for the cells with eggs not larva. In hind-sight I wish I had looked at your link to refresh my memory . He knocked down a bunch of cells in a nice line.
     
  6. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    if Im going for queen cells yes if I just want more honey then no I just add more boxes above the barrier, after the 2nd honey super is just about full Ill lift that and add the new box between the 2 honey supers to be filled
     
  7. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    I checked on them today.I found some cells but they were not that impressive so I just left them alone.Instead of making queens I made a split.I'll check them in three or four days and see what they look like.Also the places I tore down the cell walls the bees repaired.

    queen cells 001.jpg
    queen cells 004.jpg
     
  8. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Thanks for the update. I'm beginning to think that it's better for the bees to decide on their own which eggs and cells to make into new queens, rather than for us to choose by cutting certain cell walls. I too had less than impressive results by cutting cells....had far better results just by pulling out the queen and letting the hive make new cells where they wanted to. I found last time they made lots of qc's hanging off the bottoms of frames, and they looked good!- got two nice new queens from those.
     
  9. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Isn't it funny how often we keep coming back to this point in so many of the things we try and do. Rather ironic that after surviving millions of years on their own, we think we can somehow improve their situation. :lol:
     
  10. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Yes indeed, Perry. :)
     
  11. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Ditto Perry.I left something out in my up-date.When I started I entered the dates into the queen calendar provided by G3.The calender is very helpful because it helps me remember when and what I did days ago and when not to disturb the cells.Anyway four days after the graft day ,{when I kid napped the queen] was the last day to check for cells before the do not disturb time. I did an inspection and couldn't find any young cells. That doesn't mean they weren't there just that I didn't see them.So I went back home and got two frames with eggs and added them to the queen-less hive.That means fri. the qcs. should be ready. I want to say again how handy the queen calender is because I also started come cordovan queens using Zookeep's technique of putting eggs above a honey barrier with an excluder, when I checked I had one cell. When I found only one Q cell I added a cell bar frame of inverted cells aka fatbeeman utility knife and bees wax glue. This means there are four different stages going on.I am pretty sure the first one is a goose egg, but it is nice to have a sheet of paper with the dates of what I did when and what needs to happen next and when to leave them alone. Thx again G3.
     
  12. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I use that calender for every trap out I start with eggs. It's as handy as a pocket on a shirt for that also.
     
  13. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    jb63, I would be interested in hearing how those "fatbeeman" type cells work out. It was interesting to see Don make them up on his video.
     
  14. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    me too, thinking of trying it myself next spring.
     
  15. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    odd, you only found 1 cell? every time I do it I get 6 or 7 at least.
     
  16. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    I checked my queen cells and a bunch of them hatched, so I took the frame with the rest of the cells and put them in a nuc.Then I went home and pulled another frame of brood and bees and put them in the nuc.Then I put the nuc in the barn'[cool dark place.]
    queen cellc 006.jpg queen cellc 005.jpg queen cellc 004.jpg queen cellc 001.jpg
     
  17. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    When I got home I checked the cell bars. They looked ok I saw two queen cells for sure.When I looked at the brood frames I found a hatched queen cell.:shock: I became concerned there may be a young queen floating around so to protect the cell bars I cut up a queen excluder and made a cage. queen cellc 016.jpg queen cellc 011.jpg queen cellc 010.jpg queen cellc 008.jpg
     
  18. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Nice pics. :grin:
     
  19. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I'd say you are in no danger of running out of queens this year. ;D
     
  20. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Ok, the nuc that had two cells in it came out to fly today.I couldn't stand it, I had to look and see.They both hatched. caucasion queen 002.jpg caucasion queen 001.jpg