One more

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by RE Jones, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    I was at work yesterday and got a call from the front office. Could I remove some bees that had landed on a backhoe that maintenance needed to work on? My answer was sure.
    I have started keeping most of my bee removal stuff in the back of the truck, but had cleaned it out for last weekend and not put it back. Had my jacket/veil, smoker and gloves.
    Went up on the backhoe and put a cardboard box right next to the bees and they started going in the box!! Watched them as they went in and saw the queen (she is real small) go in. Most of the bees followed, but 25% would not go in the box. Swept them in, they flew back out. After an hour, I gave up and left them there.
    All of these bees are black with hardly any markings on them. They seemed to have settled in the nuc that I installed them in. Will check this weekend if the weather is nice.
    They seemed to be starving to death. As soon as they were in the nuc, they covered up the feeder where you could not see it. None of them were flying around like they usually do. They all went for the feeder.
    These bees were real gentle, may be the fact they were starving, but I could have worked them without anything as I did when I got them home.
    Robert
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Check the other 25% for another queen. Sometimes a swarm will have up to 4 and 5 queens.
     

  3. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Thanks, just learned something new.
    How do you call it Iddee? Afterswarm, swarm within swarm?
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I don't have a name for it, but if you sift your swarms through a queen excluder, you will often find multiple queens.
     
  5. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    I was thinking that there may have been more than one queen when they kept going back to the life ring they were on. I kept brushing them into the box and finally resorted to lighting the smoker and smoked them all off of the ring. I never saw another queen.
    There was something on the life ring that they were attracted to and I have no idea what it was. There was grease all over the area they were hanging around and I do not know if they were trying to get something "nutritional" off of it??
    These ladies were starving and from the way they were acting, they had nothing to drink. I had trouble getting them off of my shirt(wet with sweat) to get my bee suit on. In fact after I got the suit on, found out there were three or four bees in the suit with me. Never got stung except for one on the elbow and I probably mashed that one as I was moving around.
    I was talking to another beek yesterday and he has a hive that has two queens in it now. They are not separated and he said they have been that way for a year.
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    "I was talking to another beek yesterday and he has a hive that has two queens in it now. They are not separated and he said they have been that way for a year."

    Not as uncommon as one would think. It is known that on occasion (usually during a supercedure) a mother daughter may co-exist, the bees for whatever reason allowing it. Kinda cool really.
    Thinking about it, how many times have we stopped looking for a queen after we find one, thereby never being absolutely sure there isn't another a couple of frames over. I have been surprised on more than one occasion.
     
  7. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    Wonder why none of the bee books ever talk about more than one queen in a hive??
    It seems to be more common place than I thought.
    Robert