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that would be my guess also.

entrance reducer and robber screens would be two things to employ real quick. after that and once you are certain the robbing has ceased a bit of feed is typically required if the hive is not to perish <obviously some form of feeding where the feeder itself doesn't encourage more robbing.
 

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Thanks for that photo adamant, that along with the two comments following taught me something.
 

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crofter says:
"robbing! grab and run; not my house"

adamant, i would agree with crofter and tecumseh, this looks to be robbing. in your title in part, "something is eating it". robbers tear and chew the comb quickly to get the goods to carry off, the edges of your comb will look ragged as in your photograph, and you will most likely find bits of comb out the front door from the hive that was robbed.
 

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Ask and you will receive (an answer)
This is what makes the forum work so well. A picture works incredibly well and makes helping much easier.
Well done Adamant and those that answered! :thumbsup:
 

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...you will most likely find bits of comb out the front door from the hive that was robbed.
That would be in addition to the "snow" of wax flakes on the floor inside the hive.

Robbing usually starts when there aren't enough flowers producing nectar to keep the bees happy. That means that the feeding part of the advice given is doubly important. You don't want your hive to die of starvation.
 

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. . . you will most likely find bits of comb out the front door from the hive that was robbed.
Thanks for that piece of info. I had no idea. When I started my nuc last month, I noticed what looked like grits all over the landing board one day and wondered what was up. I guess there was some robbing going on from my main hive. Apparently, the nuc got strong enough to defend themselves because I haven't seen it since. When I put them in their new hive last weekend, I didn't use an entrance reducer because of the heat we've been having. Maybe I better get one on until they get a little stronger.
 

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Great answers, same kind of frames one can find in the spring in the boxes of colonies that didn't make it trough the winter.
If entrances are not blocked, surviving bees wil go and clean stored polen and honey, together with bits of wax.
 

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Did you see that the queen was still in the hive and uninjured ? Do you still have a reasonable bee population ? If all is well, do as others suggested, reduce the entrance and get feed on them internally (in hive).

I have seen severe robbing where the queen was killed/injured, hence making the hive unrecoverable.

Best of luck
 

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Did you see that the queen was still in the hive and uninjured ? Do you still have a reasonable bee population ? If all is well, do as others suggested, reduce the entrance and get feed on them internally (in hive).

I have seen severe robbing where the queen was killed/injured, hence making the hive unrecoverable
.

Best of luck
In such a situation wouldnt the colony create an emergency cell and hence a new queen?
 

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Mosti,

Good question and I apologize for being brief (blunt). Yes, it is possible for the colony to create an emergency queen if:

There is still larvae of the correct age (4-5 day). During some robberies I have seen brood destroyed, populations killed etc.

At best the hive would struggle badly. It takes approximately 24 days for a queen to be started, then to laying. It will be 42 plus days before any new workforce that she lays begins to bring in stores. That leaves little time in the Northern area of the US to build up for the winter.

Again, pardon my brevity, I was trained commercially and a single colony doesn't merit the attention or the gamble that an emergency cell would require. If there is a queen left, do as everyone suggested. If not and you want to recover, I'd recommend; requeen with a mated queen, get the population up and stable (brood frames) and feed.

I apologize to all, being "swave and de-boner" (******* French) is not one of my greater virtues.

Best of luck
 

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adamant,
longwoods has some great advice:
"At best the hive would struggle badly. It takes approximately 24 days for a queen to be started, then to laying. It will be 42 plus days before any new workforce that she lays begins to bring in stores. That leaves little time in the Northern area of the US to build up for the winter." and "requeen with a mated queen, get the population up and stable (brood frames) and feed."

being in a northern state an emergency cell is a gamble and waiting for a queen this time of the season would be very unwise for me. if you want to recover, i would requeen as longwoods suggested, or combine them with a stronger hive. :grin:
 
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