opinions on hive carriers wanted

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by divkabee, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. divkabee

    divkabee New Member

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    I'm looking at getting a hive carrier to help move my hives around. Would like to get your opinions on what you like and why, what sort of loads can they handle (two full deeps?), how easy they are to use, how easy they are to use to lift the hive into/out of a truck, and any other thoughts you'd like to offer. My immediate need is to move a hive to a truck, then to off at another location.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Just make sure the two young men are not going to drop the hive no matter what, and it is better if they are reliably where and when you need them. IF they are into sports they can handle two full deeps.
     

  3. divkabee

    divkabee New Member

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    Well, one of those 2 young men is going to have to be a woman, namely me.

    Any one used a furniture dolly to move hives (strapped, of course)? My hives sit on one level of cinderblocks, so I can't see how to easily move the hive onto the dolly.
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    It depends on the time of the year and what they are going into. Buy a couple of ratcher straps to hold the hive together (Bottom board. supers, inner cover and cover). At some times of the year you could lift the hive your self (going in to pollination) two weeks later after the weight can be substantial. Wheel barrels wagons and in the Tundra division toboggans work well for moving hives.
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    divkabee,
    i have moved hives, and double deeps. one of my country neighbors owns one of those hive carriers. he and his strapping young son moved a double deep hive on it, then dropped it....then did not use it to lift the hive bodies onto the bed of the truck.....

    anyway, i am unsure of the load the hive carriers can handle. this is how i move a double deep hive anytime of the year.

    can you back the truck up reasonably close to the hive for you or a helper to carry one deep at a time to the bed of the truck? do you have an extra bottom board?

    take an extra bottom board, place it in the bed of your truck, put your ratchet straps underneath this extra bottom board. go and remove the top deep of your hive. carry it and place it on the extra bottom board in your truck. go back and get the bottom deep, place it on top the first deep, add inner cover and outer cover. (this will be in reverse order of your orignial hive placement). ratchet strap the whole works. grab the original bottom board that was underneath your hive. drive to your place of move. place the original bottom board down, then move the hive bodies to the original bottom board one by one, they will be in the original order. done. the bees , they will be fine.

    hope this helps, how i move my bees, alot less work and hassle than trying to lift and carry 2 hive bodies to the bed of a pickup truck.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I am a fairly slight person and when ever I have had to move multi story hives I do it just as riverbee describes. the distance from the hives to the bed of the truck is not a minor concern for me. I almost insist on getting up close and personal.

    if the hive is a good distance then the same process could be accomplished using a moving dolly and an extra bottom and top.

    rather than straps I normally use hive staple... but essentially they accomplish the same thing by keeping the parts together during the ride.
     
  7. divkabee

    divkabee New Member

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    Thanks, riverbee and tec, for the suggestions.

    With the one box at a time technique onto the truck, how well would this work in moving a hive on the same property? What I mean is, with the bees being disturbed and free to fly around, won't they fly back to the old site if the new site is not several miles away? What I'm considering is ratchet-strapping the hive together, sealing the bees in at night with a screened entrance, moving the hive the next morning, leaving the screen in place for a day or so (during cool weather), opening the entrance, putting some branches in front to force the bees to re-orient to the new hive instead of flying back to the old site. Thus, I'm looking for a way to move the strapped hive in one piece onto a truck or dolly. Sound doable?

    Any thoughts?
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    http://www.ebay.ca/itm/1000lbs-Heav...561?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5652b4bf11
    A cart like this one the hive could be slid on, or reassembled on the cart. The hive left on the cart so the bees could find home, and then wheeled to their new location at night.
    After relocating to the new location for a few days slid the hive onto the new stand. or reassembled on the new stand.
    A cart like this would be useful for transporting supers and tool to and from the hives year round with the large tires it would pull easy on rough ground.
     
  9. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    ApisBees, I got one of those from Harbor Freight when on sell for 60.00, but I got it for a different reason to transport supers to the shop to get the honey out, had not thought of moving the hold hive but it could be easy done. Rolls easy also and like the large tires it has.

    kebee
     
  10. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    I remembered your post about it and thought it would work fine for moving a hive. You could even place the hive on the cart and roll the cart 5 Ft each day till the hive is in the new location.
     
  11. divkabee

    divkabee New Member

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    Dear ApisBees,

    Thanks for the suggestion. I actually have one of those carts and use it for moving honey frames for extracting. I don't think I would use though it to move a stacked hive, even strapped and secured, because of the terrain around my property...lots of bumps and uneven ground and the distance I'm moving the hive is probably a 1/4 mile. Even pulling the honey frames a short distance can be jarring.

    Everyone's suggestions are most appreciated and have given me some good ideas to ponder over.

    Thanks,
    divkabee
     
  12. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Once the bees have every thing glued together the bumps wont effect then it will make them want to come out of the hive but as long as there is no means for the bees to escape they would be fine with moving. I have taken bees in and out of orchards and up mountain logging roads tor fire weed honey and the bees travel fine.
     
  13. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    divkabee
    question:
    "With the one box at a time technique onto the truck, how well would this work in moving a hive on the same property? What I mean is, with the bees being disturbed and free to fly around, won't they fly back to the old site if the new site is not several miles away?"

    answer:
    it works just fine on the same property, the 1/4 mile you spoke of. we lose bees when we move them, even with a single deep screened in the night before. you could screen them in with a moving screen when moved to the new location, after they settle down, and after all are in after dusk for a day or so, or using the branch method to force them to reorient immediately. bees that are moved are disoriented, so when you move them with this method, they will stay near the last place, in short term, what they remember last. so you will have bees following the moving of hive bodies and/or flying and alighting on your truck. leave the truck close to the moved hive once it is set down, the stray bees will for the most part find it.

    question:
    "What I'm considering is ratchet-strapping the hive together, sealing the bees in at night with a screened entrance, moving the hive the next morning, leaving the screen in place for a day or so (during cool weather), opening the entrance, putting some branches in front to force the bees to re-orient to the new hive instead of flying back to the old site. Thus, I'm looking for a way to move the strapped hive in one piece onto a truck or dolly. Sound doable?......and....
    Any one used a furniture dolly to move hives (strapped, of course)? My hives sit on one level of cinderblocks, so I can't see how to easily move the hive onto the dolly."

    answer:
    the furniture dolly is probably doable......you already know you will have to lift the whole setup from the cinder block to the dolly, this takes some 'pipes', then roll it up a ramp to the bed of your truck and roll back down. my primary concern with this would be jarring frames enough to mash or injure the queen. there is no 'easy' way to move bees. when i move my bees, whether it be a single deep or double deep, my primary focus is on my queen in that hive, making sure she gets there with it safe and sound. if you use the 'one at a time method', make sure you check the bottom board left in the truck.....and that your queen isn't sitting on it.....
    :grin:

    hope this helps.
     
  14. divkabee

    divkabee New Member

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    riverbee,

    Thanks. Good suggestions!

    divkabee
     
  15. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    if moving to another 'close by' location you can accomplish this in about two ways...

    1)the quick move <confine the bees to the box for about 3 days and drape it with some fabric to make it appear totally dark inside this MAY BE somewhat difficult for a newbee mind set in that they often want to pull the cork and allow the bees to fly free and not be confined to the box for so long. bee are capable of doing nothing and being closed in for considerable period of time.

    2)the slow move <place the hive on a dolly or in a wheelbarrow and move 3 to 6 feed each day until you have the hive in the newer location. you need not even place an entrance closure using this method. this is a good process if you are curious about how long it takes bees to reorient to a new spot.

    colder weather is very much a plus in either routine since in colder weather the bees want to cluster and not move around much anyway. hard jolts (in very very cold weather) you do want to avoid since dislodging the clustering bees also MAY mean the bees will not be able to pick themselves up from the bottom board (which basically works out to they is goin'a die).
     
  16. divkabee

    divkabee New Member

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  17. CharlieB

    CharlieB New Member

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