Opps! I think this will work

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by afterburn001, Jul 5, 2012.

  1. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    Ok, I went out to check the super of one of our hives. Here is the set up; Deep, deep, excluder, super.

    When I opened the top, the first two frames were capped honey. when I got to the third frame I found the most perfect brood pattern. same on four and five. :lol: Yup, during our last inspection we must have set deep #2 on top of the super so we could inspect deep #1 and the queen dropped in to the super.

    Anyway, I persuaded the queen to go back down in to the deep where she belonged and she seemed happy to do it. During the inception of the first deep I found three supersedure cells. I did not want to take the queen from that hive so I took just that one frame with the cells and set it aside in a 5 frame nuc. Now, at home I have a hive that I have been wanting to split up in to 2 or three nucs anyway so I took that one frame in with the cells on it home with me and gave them a few frames of honey a frame of brood and a bunch of nurse bees.

    I know that's not the traditional way of doing it but it achieved one of my goals of splitting my home hive up and letting them raise a new queen.

    Is there any reason that would come back to bite me?
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Sounds good to me. Have done it several times to start a trap out.
     

  3. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    Wheh! That's a relief. I had to think on my feet with this one. I was half expecting someone to say; " NO! Now both hive are going to explode in to a fireball of wax and honey!" :lol:
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    afterburner writes...
    I had to think on my feet with this one.

    tecumseh...
    you have arrived as a beekeeper. the ability to think on your feet is for most folks (the 99% so to speak) from some experience and some reflection of the current context of the particular situation. the context will always be changing so 'thinking on your feet' is (imho) an essential skill for beekeeping. the more you do the more the skill will be honed and polished.

    ps... transporting cells can be a bit dicey and since you don't know the exact age of the cell the greater the potential risk involved in damaging the cell in transport. after some seven days or so (I am assuming here the cell was capped???) I myself would do a quick check to make certain the cell did in fact hatch.
     
  5. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    Yes the cell(s) were capped. There were three in all. Transport was one of my concerns as well, I read about how critical this stage was. Fortunately my truck drives like a Cadillac and I drove very easy. If memory serves, it takes eight days from capped to emerge for a queen (?) I think I will check in a week to see if any have hatched. If not I'll give them another frame of eggs.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    adding a frame of young brood is a good idea even if the cell(s_ are viable. I was trying to quickly think of some reason (context) where this would not be a good idea and cannot think of a single reason.
     
  7. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    I couldn't wait! I went out to see if any of the cells were open and one was!!! Here is our brand new queen only a few hours old!:clapping:Still all cute and fuzzy. I'm going to create one more nuc with the reaming two cells.
    New-queen-L.jpg New-queen2-L.jpg
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    She's a keeper! :thumbsup:
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    She looks like she's got a good future ahead of her. :thumbsup:
     
  10. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    Well that makes ten hives now.

    When she takes her mating flight, is it just one and done or will she keep going until properly mated?
     
  11. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    She will take several over two or three days...........weather permitting.
     
  12. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    Good! this nuc is at our home and we only have one other hive here. It has a lot of drones but not as many as the eight hives out on the farm. Our weather finally turned from cold an rainy to upper seventy's an sun for the foreseeable future!
     
  13. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    So as I stated earlier, after the first of the three queen cells on that one frame hatched, I took the frame with the remaining two cells and put it in another nuc. Say hello to our second new born queen in two days! This is sooooo fun!!!
    Queen10-Crop-XL.jpg
     
  14. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

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    Love this thread - Beekeeping is so fun! Way to go! a two-fer!
     
  15. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    From the look of that solid pattern you are working with good genetics. Congrats. :thumbsup:
     
  16. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    the mating of queens quite often occurs in the early afternoon when the air temperature is warm but not too warm. here it is the 'too warm' that usually mucks up the queen mating in the later part of the summer.

    from the day of hatching in about 16 days the queen should begin to lay. the larvae of course are much easier to see so if you look at or about 3 weeks post hatching then you should see larvae in some quantity. this is also a good opportunity to see if the new queens laying pattern (in a developing circle and not just here and there) is acceptable.