Orphan Bees

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by theFuzz, Sep 21, 2017.

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  1. theFuzz

    theFuzz New Member

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    20170921_130827.jpg So today a hive dropped off the back of I assume a truck in front of my house. Millions of bees littered the roadside but the box appeared only slightly broken there appears to be a good amount of live bees still in the box. I know 20170921_130911.jpg nothing about caring for bees but if I can save the colony that is something I really want to do any help is super much appreciated. will post pics soon. happily they allowed me to pic up their home and put it in a wagon while trampling hundreds of bees on the roadside and wheel it 200m to my yard without stinging me.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2017
  2. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    Welcome aboard...and into the world of bee keeping..its not that hard to keep bees, although sometimes when all goes right things go bad..but you have a great start with free bees and a hive..set the hive up in a very full sun spot, put any frames back in the hive and the bees will straighten up the inside...then do a little research on caring for bees and they should do their own thing with minor interference from humans..also what is your location? hives have thousands of bees, so even so a bunch got trampled there should be plenty left, now lets hope the queen survived that ordeal, if not its not the end of the world..after setting up the hive in a week or so you can check for new brood to see if the queen lived...you can research all that info on this sight...
     

  3. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    what does taking the hive miles away and then bringing it back do for the bees? curious..
     
  4. theFuzz

    theFuzz New Member

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    Yes I called around to see if anyone was missing a hive and for now the hive is parked in my driveway. I live in the country closest neighbor is 600 m down the Rd. I don't see why I should have to drive the bees several kms away they are currently sitting on an alfalfa field with cherry and apple orchards all around. They should be pretty happy where they are.
    In the crash they got tons of dirt and sticks and leaves all sorts of debris inside their house and all over their combs is there a good way to go about doing some house cleanin?

    I live in the Okanagan of BC Canada average winter temp is approx -10c and at night -15c winter is coming what can I do to help these guys survive. Should I build an insulated box? They appear to have lots of honey for how many are left alive will they need sugar or...?
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2017
  5. theFuzz

    theFuzz New Member

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    Thanks very much. So from this I surmise that the best course of action would be to put a sign up for lost bees at the feont of my drive move the colony to the back field of My property where there is full sun. I will build a replica of their box I can transfer the frames into as I clean them and their box out leave them there for almost a month and as the first frosts start to come move them down to where I intend to keep them for the winter. I realize I'm probably a nuisance on the forum I honestly never thought I'd be caring for bees before but I realize the importance of a hive and want to "keep the hive alive" at all costs. Plus it sounds like a really fun project to take on with my daughter.
     
  6. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    in my book finders keepers..if noone has come looking for the bees..they are yours now, enjoy them...this forum is for people like us to ask lots of questions and get help, so NO ONE is a nuisance for wanting to learn...
     
  7. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    people come here for help and assistance..not to be parented by others from far away...maybe if you spoke not in riddles or long drawn out chatter, one could understand what your saying...and if the person that lost or dropped the bees actually missed them, it would be up to them to find their lost children, but to advertise and have a line of people looking for free bees would be the outcome of that...all I got out of your posts the way you have presented them is a bit on the condescending side..so if you wish to rephrase and explain your thoughts more clearly to clarify your position..by all means please do...:)
    PS, here you have a person willing to take the time and effort to save a hive of bees rather than let them die in a pile of broken wood in the roadway and all you can find to say is to scold the person for not taking out a full page add in every paper to find who carelessly let them drop off whatever truck or trailer that was transporting them...just my 2 cents..nothing personal..
     
  8. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    well that or you just have the same effect on others...adios..
     
  9. theFuzz

    theFuzz New Member

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    Thank you both for your replies. I don't have any moral hard feelings about keeping the bees or not keeping the bees I just want to try to keep the colony alive.
     
  10. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    your doing the right thing, keeping the bees alive, where they originally came from is not important...you will enjoy caring and letting them grow, and you can get some great honey for your troubles..
     
  11. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    I don't think the important bit about moving the bees got through all of that exchange!

    The rule is move them 3' or 3 miles. The reason is the bees orient to the location not the hive so much, so the "field" bees that go out and forage every day will return to the old location even if they and the hive were moved at night to a new spot and they flew out the entrance just a little while before. Moving them a long way triggers an instinct to reorient to the new location but moving them short distances does not.
    If the bees have been out foraging they will be oriented to their location and you will have a lot of confused lost bees if you move them around the property wily-nllly. The wagon seems like a good way to move them gradually every day to where you want them. They do not need to be next to the resources they need, much better to be in a favorable location and then fly some distance to forage, gather water etc.

    Some states require all hive equipment be marked as to the owner and all bee keepers registered with the state. Others do not. Of course sometimes not all of it gets marked but its worth looking.

    There are frequently bee keepers associations listed online so you can make contact with mentors to help you get the bees through the winter. Most likely they will need combining with a strong hive to have any chance in your area. An experienced keeper can help you a LOT.
     
  12. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    obvious this is not the ideal or even close to ideal for the op to start bee keeping, but is was thrust on to him , so making the best of the situation and im sure we can agree the more important aspect is to do whats needed to help the bees survive..so lets agree to drop the drama and work at resolving the task at hand..what if the op moves the bees to the final location for wintering and left a box with 1 frame in the original location to catch any lost or misguided bees that will be returning, then the op can keep moving them into the hive, its not the best way, but without touring the bees miles around town its the best option avail at this time..I have moved a hive in this manor to relocate about 100ft and after a few days only a very few bees would go back to the original location...im sure some bees never made it to the new hive location, but a very small amount..sometimes whats optimum to do is just not feasible.. :)
     
  13. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Well you have made a good start. and the very rude gentleman is probably making a departure. You are not a nuisance for asking questions. Unfortunately I got tied up at work and didn't get to the forum. How are your bees doing?