Outside the hive...

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ktbearpaws, Aug 4, 2010.

  1. ktbearpaws

    ktbearpaws New Member

    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Some of you guys say you can pretty much tell what is going on inside your hive, by the way your bees act at the hive entery.....
    So how will your bees act if your hive is preparing to swarm?
    Or what about if your hive becomes queenless?
    Or how about if your bees become sick or have been infested mites?
     
  2. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

    Messages:
    1,146
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Mostly everyone here has more experience than I and can better answer your question. This is simply what I did as a result of watching the hives.

    This spring I noticed that one hive was less active than the other. It seemed there were fewer bees coming and going. I didn't know what was the problem, but I was pretty sure there was a problem. So, I decided to have a good look at the bottom boxes. The queen was gone, but I found out before I lost the hive.

    I ordered a queen, installed her, and the hive is doing fine now.

    There are probably distinctive behaviours as you questioned, but I'm not that experienced. I go by the gross measure: "something's different".

    Walt
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would suggest...
    1) what is happening external to the hive only gives you a CLUE* to what is happening inside the hive (Walt B's example works quite well here). In most cases the evidence or clue is not all you need to know but simply suggest you need to look a bit further.
    2)a large number of things (bearding ->swarming in the prime swarm season ) tend to be seasonally defined.... therefore some clues in certain seasons suggest what is likely happening inside the hive.
    3) no single external clue* is an absolute predication of what is happening inside the hive. the more clues observed external to the hive makes any prediction (prior to opening the hive) much more likely.