Oxytet a problem?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by PerryBee, Nov 12, 2011.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Just received a couple of links that suggest that the use of Oxytet (when combined with other pesticides that bees can normally withstand) may lower bees resistance to those pesticides.

    http://westernfarmpress.com/management/ ... rting-hive


    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi ... ne.0026796

    I stopped using Oxytet a few years ago and even Fumadil more recently. If I had a problem I'm not saying I wouldn't go back to using Fumadil (fumajillan B) but as far as Oxytet (teremyacin) IMHO, I figure it only masks the problem anyways, better to just burn.
     
  2. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Antibiotics are great for raising chemical resistant diseases. AFB and EFB are already resistant over most of the country. Then there is the stress of killing all the good things in the bees systems.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    thanks for the links Perrybee.

    the article seems to suggest the link is with bee keeper applied insecticides (for varroa mite).

    somewhat in reference to Americasbeekeeper post above.... I would agree with the first sentence but would likely change sentence one with the modifiers 'Off label use and blanket use of antibiotics and anti varroa agents are great for raising more resistant diseases and hardier varroa. Sentence two... at this point in time I have no real evidence that there is that much useful to kill in a bee digestive tract <this of course may change tomorrow if the science folks get to the point of showing that there is... which is to say any flora associated with a bee gut activity is highly speculative at this point in time.
     
  4. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Foulbrood antibiotic resistance is in the genes. A natural plasmid, pMA67 is present in all the resistant strains of foulbrood.
    http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/jul07/bee0707.pdf

    "Antibiotics kill beneficial bacteria as well as pathogens. You may be killing the beneficial bacteria bees need for good health. While little is known about beneficial bacteria in honey bees, when we have looked in other organisms beneficial bacteria have been found."
    http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu/documents/CAPArticle4.html
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a few years ago I blanket treated with TM (typically in the fall of the year) primarily because that was what a migratory bee keeper had taught me to do years ago. at some point I realized that my circumstance as a set down bee keeper was much different from my former employer. at this point in time I knew there was some small risk in terminating TM as a blanket treatment so over the next two season I added quite a large quantity of bee genetics from the minnesota hygienic program as something of a buffer. the downside of this is the hygienic bees are a bit more testy than almost anything else I have in my apiaries.