Pea-meal based protein substitutes?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by BKeilman, May 30, 2011.

  1. BKeilman

    BKeilman New Member

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    I'm reading a beekeeping book from 1916 because they're free on the B&N Nook, and it's funny how much things haven't changed.

    And then I come to this:

    (pertaining to providing pollen substitutes to increase brood growth)
    "The author has had better success by mixing pea-meal - with a pinch of salt added - into a thick paste with honey, and after plastering it into an empty comb, giving it directly to the brood-nest. Last autumn a fair colony cleaned out a 1/4 lb of this mixture in one night, and, on the examination of the brood-nest next morning, not a trace of pea-meal could be found. That the brood benefited is quite apparent, for it is the strongest colony in a yard of one hundred."


    So yeah. This seems like good advice. I'm wondering if we do something similar today, or if we just use pollen substitute patties I've seen around.

    Also, what is pea-meal? Basically ground up yellow peas? I tried a google search to little avail.

    Thanks!
    Ben


    Source

    Rayment, Tarlton. Money in Bees in Australasia. a Practical Treatise on the Profitable Management of the Honey Bee in Australasia. p. 86. Print. 1916
     
  2. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

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    Yellow pea meal which I think is the same they use for pea meal bacon,and you can also buy split dried green peas also.
    Here is a few sites that sell split and whole yellow peas( that you could grind in a coffee grinder).

    http://www.purcellmountainfarms.com/Yel ... ole%29.htm

    http://www.amazon.com/Yellow-Split-Peas ... B0000GJFNM

    http://www.urbanherbsonline.com/Merchan ... t_Count=11


    I also found this you may want to read:

    http://www.beekeeping.org/articles/us/e ... itutes.htm

    Hope this helps you
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    well I didn't say anything after your post numero uno but do keep up the good work. imho informing folks of some of the 'history' of bee keeping is a very worthwhile effort. it is curious how some subjects seem to resurface at predictable intervals. this sometimes leads to reinventing the wheel... typically long after the negative aspects of the 'new wheel' have been forgotten.

    defatted soybean meal is a common component of pollen substitute/supplements. I think (not absolutely sure???) the fat is removed to limit digestion problems. I would guess the salt was added to add some attractive component for the bees.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I would imagine that pea flour evolved into soy flour and is the same as we use today for pollen sub.
     
  5. BKeilman

    BKeilman New Member

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    Wow. Good stuff, Crackerbee. Thanks!

    And, Tecumseh, I'm glad that there is some good to be found in my lack of desire to buy up-to-date books

    When would you use something like this? Just when pollen is low?
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    BKeilman:
    There is lots of good stuff in them old books. Sometimes the somewhat dated writing style makes reading a bit slow for me.

    If you see significant pollen resources stored in the hive (in the frames) and plenty of full pollen baskets as the field force returns to their hive then there is likely little value to pollen substitutes/supplements <somewhat different definitions for these. Of course from a nutrition point of view any time the pollen's amino acid analysis is deficient (from the needs of the bee) then there may be some value to feeding pollen like products.

    a good general reference for the amino acid requirement and analysis of pollen is "Fat Bee, Skinny Bee" which was produced in Australia. if nothing else it will give you an insight into how deficient some pollen sources are as nutrition for honey bees.
     
  7. BKeilman

    BKeilman New Member

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