Perennial Plants For Next Year and Attracting Bees

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by blueblood, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

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    Tithonia seeds are fairly common. I have seen them at the big box home improvement stores, my local garden center, Target, Walmart, and KMart. The Torch variety has reached over 6 ft. tall in my yard.
     
  2. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Blueblood:
    Now that your daughter will be driving, tell her to watch out for the cops there, they're mean!!!! :lol:
     

  3. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Ha! It really does scare me....
     
  4. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

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    As I did my nightly watering routine (will this drought ever end?) I noticed the Caryopteris was in bloom and my bees working the blooms. Even though Caryopteris is a drought tolerant small shrub, mine has needed to be watered in the last couple of weeks. You might look into Caryopteris as a choice for your pollinator garden. They are beautiful and attract butterflies, bumblebees and honey bees.
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Caryopteris is pretty - I notice it is a spirea - where would I find it though? I've not seen it in the big box stores or garden centers (but I didn't ask by name)
     
  6. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

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    Gypsi- I have two Caryopteris. One is variegated. I know I bought the variegated Caryopteris at a local Master Gardeners plant sale. In case you don't have Master Gardeners in Texas, they are volunteers through the State agricultural college. They fund their projects by holding plant sales, which usually contain a lot of native plant material as well as tried and true cultivars for the area.
    I looked on the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower web site and it appears that it is not native to Texas. I would guess, that in Texas, you might have to give it afternoon shade.
     
  7. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    We have Master Gardeners, but they don't seem to DO much. Then we have advanced amateurs like me. I'll see what I can find, thank you!
     
  8. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

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    After the nice rain we received from Hurricane Isaac, I noticed that my Autumn Joy sedums are about to bloom. The bees and butterflies enjoy these late bloomers. They are great to have around because of their late blooming season. They are also drought tolerant and multiply very easily from cuttings. In a few years you can have lots of sedums.
     
  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    "In a few years you can have lots of sedums."

    Only if you don't drown them. My watering practice is a bit unusual. Every couple of weeks I throw a hose on the ground in the center of a patch of ornamental plants on a slow drip, and leave it there for a couple of days. This has killed my wisteria. And I think I had some sedums and a columbine a couple of years ago. But I don't have time to water every day and I am teaching my plants to put down deep roots. I do soaker hose the garden daily or every other day when we don't get rain, but again, I half-drown it, then let it dry out.
     
  10. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    I've tried to kill wisteria at home and at my Mom's-I've dug halfway to China and it sneaks back twice as invasive-guess I better try slow drowning. This is probably a different cultivar and drowning would send it into a growth frenzy.
     
  11. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I had to google Wisteria.....that is awesome....purple cascades of blooms...I like it very much...
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    In clay soil with poor drainage and summer heat, it turned yellow, I thought it was dry and gave it another good drink, and it was dead a week later. I've seen wisterias die or almost die in yards where there was a pond leak too.

    Mine had finally bloomed, I bought a 5 gallon one, and it grew to 14 feet and finally bloomed, just gorgeous. Dead a month later. But I don't know if bees like the blooms. Does anyone know?
     
  13. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Wisteria is beautiful, but you need to keep up with it. It is lovely, growing up one of my porch posts, but every year I have to get the ladder and pull it out from under the roof shingles and between soffit boards. It keeps trying to choke the neighboring lilac, too.

    Back to hyssop, I planted some a few years back , and it is struggling. Trouble is, I also have a lot of catnip, and I can't tell the small plants apart until it is too late, and the catnip is winning the battle. May have to move the hyssop to a new plot.
     
  14. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Hobie,

    Do the bees work the wisteria? I wouldn't mind getting another one and putting it in a better drained location IF the bees will work it.

    And will vitex start from seed? Because I have pounds and pounds of seed from mine. Going to try to start some in greenhouse.
     
  15. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

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    Gypsi- keep us up to date about the vitex seed in the greenhouse. I'm curious.

    I think vitex will reseed itself readily. Someone as the bee club keeps bringing in seedlings to share. That's where I got mine. The seedlings were about 4 inches tall the first of June.
    As for wisteria, if they weren't so gorgeous I don't think anyone would bother with them because you have to have just the right location. My wisteria is growing along the ground and of course it hasn't bloomed. We had some construction work done a few years back. I was surprised it lived. Some how the trunk was damaged and it is growing horizontal.
    I saw an article in the newspaper, a couple of years ago, about a woman that had a 30 year old wisteria that finally bloomed! Funny, that made the news.
     
  16. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    My obnoxious wisteria bloomed after 18 years and 3 different locations- I moved it to the back fence 'cause I figured if it never bloomed it still would provide the birds a nice place to nest. It exploded in growth and I've been wrestling with it every since because my chain link fence can only support so much. Finally, last year decided to take it out but procrastinated and lo and behold , it bloomed like crazy this spring! All kinds of insects loved it except my bees-bumble bees,butterflies but I never saw a single honey bee.
     
  17. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I am not going to replant a wisteria if the bees don't like it. My neighbor rarely waters deeply, and his wisteria blooms every years. Mine waited 8 years and grew to monster size on occasional deep soaks, bloomed once, then drowned. My guess is, they like it a bit dry.

    But no bees, no buy plant. I am taking out my boxwoods - they are on the north side of my house. Not sure which would do better with not much direct sun: abelia or pink hawthorn - does anyone know?
     
  18. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood Member

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    Here's a picture I took of one of my Caryopteris, in bloom, last night. bees and cars 007.jpg
    I noticed recently that it had reseeded itself in a nearby pot. One seedling was variegated, the other plain. I separated and re-potted both. Maybe they will have a chance to get established before winter
     
  19. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Beautiful flower! I am hoping to get swiss chard, spinach, onions and broccoli in if the rain ever comes. Does no good to plant spinach if it is too hot in the day time, and the rest require rather frequent moisture to germinate. For flowers, I'm making wildflower mudbombs and bombing the "neighborhood" (primarily empty lots with grass and weeds, plus woods and a creek)
     
  20. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I like me some purple and blue flowers...my favorite....nice shot with the bee...