Philippine native stingless bee

Discussion in 'Mason & other alternative bees' started by Apo Mariano, Oct 5, 2013.

  1. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    I just want to share my first stingless bee colonies. The scientific name is Trigona biroi friese or commonly called "kiyot" here in the Philippines.



    The arrival
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    Waiting to fly
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    1st hive strong start
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    2nd hive trying to keep up
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  2. Oblio13

    Oblio13 New Member

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    Thank you for posting pics. I'm looking forward to learning more about these.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    As am I.
    And to think you were able to figure out how to post pictures on only your third post, it took me months to figure out how. You are a great addition to the forum. :thumbsup:
     
  4. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    thank you for posting these really cool pictures! looking forward to updates from you on your new colonies!
    and i will echo what perry said....."You are a great addition to the forum. [​IMG]"
     
  5. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    Thank you all! I'm still new to beekeeping and looking forward to learn also from you guys. In the future, I might try raising the european bees
     
  6. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    By the way, I've tried making my own trigona pollination hive to save some money. I will be using this to soft-split the wild stingless bee hive in our backyard in a couple of days.


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  7. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Great pictures. And I agree with those above, pictures after only a couple of post? You da man
     
  8. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    Thanks Wayne! I've already started soft-splitting the hive from our backyard. Hopefully, the bees will try to lay eggs on my new hive and store some honey and pollen on it. Keeping my fingers crossed. I will post pictures tomorrow!:)
     
  9. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    The bees have started settling in my homemade hive. Waiting for them to lay eggs.
     
  10. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    ​Here's an addition to my existing hive. This one I rescued from a local farmer who happens to believe that raising these bees is "goodluck" for gambling.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    ​Transferred to another hive.

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  12. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    ​An unexpected guest at our vegetable garden.

    Apis Cerana (Asian honeybee)


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  13. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    ​My first inspection of hive 1

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    The beekeeper


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  14. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    heard of stingless bee's never seen inside of one. Do they actually make combs or like bumblebees over here a random collection of individual cells. How do you harvest honey without destroying the colony? lol you may want to track down that Asian honeybees colony suspect you could more easily manipulate those bees.
    Barry
     
  15. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    Hi Barry thanks for dropping by. I'm not familiar with bumblebees but I believe they are somewhat similar in terms of cells. Stingless bees, make honeypots where they store their pollen and honey. The brood lies in the middle in somewhat spiral/pyramid form.

    These bees produce very small amounts of honey, about 1 liter per year so it's not really ideal for honey harvesting. Although, there are some beekeepers here who also sells honey coming from these bees. The price of the honey is way more expensive than the Apis millefera honey and is believed to have greater medicinal value. The downside is the difficulty in harvesting it as the colony will be destroyed. There is still no technology that will simplify the harvesting as far as I know because of its complex hive formation.

    The advantage of keeping these bees however lies in the amount of propolis it can generate. It can produce greater amount of propolis as compared to honeybees. Also, because it's a native bee it's more hardy in terms of diseases or pest. It's practically pest and disease free. It also doesn't swarm/abscond and would likely stay in their hive for years.

    My future project would be to keep other native bees, that asian honeybee I've shown above will be in my hive soon.:smile:
     
  16. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    lol, and from everything that I understand just because they don't sting doesn't mean they're defenseless being careless will make you pay lol.
     
  17. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    oh yeah everything I've read indicates bumble bee honey is quite bitter.
     
  18. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    They actually bite but it really doesn't hurt. What annoys intruders is the swarming of all the guard bees.

    Stingless bee honey on the contrary is a bit sour like a pineapple taste.
     
  19. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    so then while they're biting you're not trying to spray formic acid into the wound created by the bite? perhaps I'm thinking about ants too much lol.
     
  20. Apo Mariano

    Apo Mariano New Member

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    Trying my luck in baiting a swarm of apis cerana. This hive is based on the japanese hive designed for apis cerana japonica. I hope our native bees will adapt this design.

    No frames unlike the langstroth design. The wire mesh will help hold the honeycombs in place once the bees start to settle in.[​IMG]

    Beeswax are placed inside to attract bees. It is supposed to be melted and brushed on to the walls but I got too lazy. Lemongrass are also rubbed on to the walls as bee attractant.

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    The top bar where the bees will attach their honeycombs
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    Ready to go!
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