pics of foundationless comb.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by pistolpete, Jul 16, 2013.

  1. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    This was a frame drawn out between two drawn frames. I was hoping to use it for cut comb, but the queen got to it first and filled it with drone brood. Also a queen cage that I made for transferring a queen from a nuc to a hive. They chewed under the rim pretty quick and released the queen. dronecomb.jpg foundationless.jpg queencage.jpg backlitcomb.jpg an intresting detail visible on the backlit comb is that the cells on the back side are offset instead of lined up, making the comb more rigid.
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Nice pics, but you should correct the date setting on the camera. :wink:
     

  3. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    how do you mean correct? It was the correct date. I don't like the date to show at all, that was an accident.
     
  4. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    Nice pics. :thumbsup:
    Are you having troubles keeping the comb straight? I've been swapping over to foundationless and I have only had one instance where I had to assist, and I'm using deep frames.
    I've found drastically less burr comb and oddly placed drone brood.
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I read 08.06.2013 on the date inclusion. In this part of the world it would translate to the 8th of June. In the US (and Canada?) it would usually be understood as August 6th. Obviously the latter couldn't be correct (yet), so I guess the pics were taken in June, not July. :mrgreen:
     
  6. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Pete before the bees cap the brood cells, shake the bees off and put the frame in the freezer for a few hours. It will kill the brood and eggs. The bees will clean them out and fill with honey and the comb will still be usable for comb honey. You may need to use a Queen excluder to keep the queen from relaying in the frame.
     
  7. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Yes, I put that frame in the freezer a couple of weeks ago, but I was under the impression that once there was brood in there once, it would not make good comb honey.

    The pics were taken June 8.
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Only if aloud to be capped and the larva pupates and sheds its cocoon.
     
  9. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Nice pictures. Thanks.
     
  10. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I had a comb of foundationless collapse on me yesterday; it was totally unwired and without thinking I flipped it without doing the little pirouette!. The center was drone brood but a nice arcing band of honey at the top that was done before the queen got there. It was easy to cut along the line where the comb was darkened by brood and I got the first in my life piece of cut comb honey! The chickens got the balance after I pulled a bunch of drone for mite checking.