1. Ray

    Ray Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I have read several posts, about the use of plywood in hive construction and I was wondering:???:?
    Water does't effect the glue in the plywood, but it will effect the wood and cause issues.
    I have read about deep frying (rosin and wax) the woodware. Would that create issues with the glue or not?
    There are plastic/foam hive bodies. Does anybody have a Bee friendly sealant for plywood.
    I am thinking:roll: along the lines of hive bottoms and covers.
     
  2. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Wet dry cycles causes mechanical stresses that gradually pulls the glue out of the wood where alternating grain is exposed. If you can cap the end grain as PerryBee does in his covers and bottoms the plywood stands up well. I have only handled a few heat dipped bodies and they appear not to have been glued. PVA glue will melt at those temperatures. I dont know whether it would heal up sound or not. I really is hard to seal end grain plywood as the expansion rate being three or more times greater in different directions gradually separates it. Everyone who sells a sealer says it is wonderful. Raw linseed oil thick and often is reasonably effective and cheap but the best is to hide the end grain by embedding it into soft and gummy calking tube type construction adhesive that has a lot of give.
     

  3. Lburou

    Lburou Member

    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I think you should try it and report back to us. A good wax dip should isolate the wood from the elements for a long time. :)
     
  4. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,752
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I use plywood for my summer migratory covers, have one that despite being painted had a pretty good warp on it, the rest are ok
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would just suggest you stay away from the 'green plywood'. The product may be safe now (use to be called copper something) but years ago with a bit of water it would put off a low level gas which would keep a hive sickly and unproductive.
     
  6. Lburou

    Lburou Member

    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Yes, the old pressure treatment process included arsenic, but the new process uses another chemical. Arsenic was released into the atmosphere when you burned the old wood. :)
     
  7. Ray

    Ray Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Lburou "I think you should try it and report back to us. A good wax dip should isolate the wood from the elements for a long time. :smile:"

    probably won't get at it his year, procrastination is my middle name:lol:
    Thinking about 5 frame nucs with plywood sides and dimensional lumber for the ends, maybe tomorrow I'll get right on it.
     
  8. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

    Messages:
    469
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've been meaning to read some self help books on procrastination, just haven't gotten around to yet :)
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The feed store here is selling 4 ft. x 4 ft. peices of 3/4" plywood for $6.00 a sheet, i bought one and made 4 bottoboards out of it and painted the edges and the landing board back in about 2", i also screw a 2"x 2"x 20" cca rail on both under sides to keep it off the blocks. i'll see how it works. Most of my hives have sbb's, but i'm thinking the 3/4" plywood would be good for nuc bottom boards. Jack
     
  10. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm using 3/4 inch plywood when I build my 6 frame hives or nucs.
    I've got healthy colonies in those boxes.
    I paint the outside with a exterior latex.
     
  11. Mosti

    Mosti New Member

    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That is a good idea. I would not use plywood for hives except for nucs which I intend to do some time near. I would opt for marine grade plywood since it would stand better to the outdoor elements, however I am unsure if the type of glue in it would harm the colony!? The difference (I am allways told) from regular and marine plywood is in the glue.

    However I must admit that I very much prefer the use of 8x4 pine panels in 3/4 or 5/8, it is easier to work than plywood and the grain is much nicer.
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    My experiences with plywood have generally been very good---I find that all hive parts of plywood have been as good as those of regular lumber. Everything has its limitations and drawbacks, but when comparing parts made of regular cut wood to those of plywood, I couldn't say that one is better than the other.
     
  13. Fuzzystuff

    Fuzzystuff New Member

    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm an opportunist so if I have plywood I use it and if I have pine I use it. I only use treated for the bottom cross pieces of base. Most of my lumber comes off the job site. Like any wood product exposed to the weather it always lasts longer with a sealer on it. I used exterior latex paint.
     
  14. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    types of lumber I use.

    My Nucs and 6 frame hives are made of 3/4 plywood mostly.
    But all my Hives both 10 and 8 frame are made of Pine, Red and White Oak, Cypress and such.
    Whatever the customer wants if made of.
    I use exterior latex paint also.
    For my own hives I take the scrap wood that's left and glue it together using wood clamps and tite bond II glue.
    I then run the board thru the planner to smooth it out then trim it up, cut my box joints, cut the frame rest and glue and nail it.
    The titebond Glue is food grade and the bees don't mind it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2013