Pointers please

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by prittstick, May 30, 2009.

  1. prittstick

    prittstick New Member

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    Ok question from a TOTAL newcomer any advice and obsenities welcome :)

    Collected our first swarm from someones garden recently and have now got the bees in a hive with 5 brood frames.This was about a week ago...We had some problems with the bees coming out and grouping on the side of the hive, but we collected them up and put them back in and moved the queen excluder down to the base to stop her ( if it was her!) from coming out.Now they are staying put and seem to be working.We have now removed the queen excluder and all seems well.We are feeding as well through the crown board with a sugar solution.

    Two days ago we opened the hive with a little smoke to see what we could see, and this is what I need help with really please, the swarm was not a massive one, they have started to draw out the inner two frames with cone but although we looked for eggs at first glance ( and we wernt there that long looking really, just a few seconds) we couldnt see eggs or a queen although there was a small bunch of bees on one of the frames...What should we do now, how soon, and what should we look for..?

    Any help appreciated for a total newcomer straight in at the deep end..Thanks pritt
     
  2. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Chances are excellant that if the bees are there then the queen is there as well, they are drawing out comb, and foraging--should have seen nectar and pollen collectinons. typically takes the new queen a week or so to start laying start being concerned in the third week if no brood present. also should allow the bees about those same 3 weeks before disturbing them--yeah know is tough not to want to check up on the girls, but wait as takes them several hours/ days to regroup from a major disruption like a though look over.
    Barry
     

  3. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    When exactly did you hive them? Usually the swarm has the old queen, so she should start laying as soon as she has someplace to lay. Perhaps, like me, you just can't see eggs. Eggs turn to larva in three days, so maybe you'll be able to see something in a little while. Are they storing honey and pollen?
     
  4. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    As for seeing small larvae and eggs if you turn the frame upside down you can see them alot better
    Barry
     
  5. prittstick

    prittstick New Member

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    Thank you..Tia and Barry.
    So would you say that its 90% sure that the queen is there? That would be great..By the fact that they are still there and foraging and drawing out cone definately means she is there or possibly not??
    Also by Barrys advice we should leave them alone for a couple more weeks and then have a gook look.
    In the meantime keep feeding yes? They are busy foraging today.
    Thank you very much for your help....can we come back to you for more help when needed?
    Kind regards
    pritt :)
     
  6. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    If your not in a nectar flow then definately feed, if you are in a nectar flow not needed but can be helpful. With regards to the queens presence as stated if the bees are gathering pollen and nectar they are doing it for a reason--they are planning on rearing brood. As I stated previously, if you take a frame ( in about a week or so ), and turn the frame upside down, holding it up to the sunlight the cells angles will be right for sunlight to fully go down into the cell and you should be able to see eggs, and small larvae remember the life cycle for worker bees 21 days from egg to hatching--within 3 weeks you should be seeing all stages of brood even allowing the queen 2 weeks to start. And of course come back whether you need help or not we enjoy your company.
    Barry
     
  7. prittstick

    prittstick New Member

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    Thanks Barry, appreciated. :D
     
  8. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Never any harm in feeding. They won't take it if they don't need it. Just watch for robbers.
     
  9. prittstick

    prittstick New Member

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    Thanks Tia......and by robbers you mean the furry sort yes??
     
  10. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    No, actually I meant other beehives, yellow jackets, hornets, bumbles, etc. A swarm is most times not strong enough to defend itself against these predators. I would reduce the entrance (I trust you're not using entrance feeders!).
     
  11. prittstick

    prittstick New Member

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    Thanks Tia,

    No, we are feeding through the crown board.
    Point taken on reducing the entrance size.Thank you.

    You know one thing that has has amazed me with this hobby is the friendly easily given advice that is forthcoming.Its really nice to know that you can ask questions on what others probably learned years ago and not feel too silly.

    Thanks all :) pritt
     
  12. dogsoldier13

    dogsoldier13 New Member

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    check out the walt wright articles
    :D
     
  13. prittstick

    prittstick New Member

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    Thanks dog soldier, I will check them out.