pollen substitute

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by 2kooldad, Jan 7, 2012.

  1. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    like sugar water is a substitute for nector at feeding time....i read someplace that a kind of flour could be used as a substitute for pollen....i think i remember it being rye flour....is this true....can the bees use this for brood ???
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    de fatted Soy Flour (I can obtain this here at the local Krogers) to be more exact. brewers year is suppose to be better (closer to the amino acid content of pollen).

    tecumseh's basic economic rule number 1 is : there is no marginal benefit from providing something that is already present in excess. or more practically stated> if you have pollen coming in a hive and pollen stored in the frame there is likely no real benefit from feeding something that 'is something like' pollen.
     
  4. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    lol...ok...what is brewers yeast an how/where do you get it....mind you i wont be getting any soon problly...its more of a ''read it...now im curious'' type of thing...i have pollen comming in...2 diffrent colors of it...so im not in a spot to need it....i was thinking more if i did get into a jam one day if it would help....this is so far at this point an my level, beyond what i wanna try yet but can you add stuff to things like this to make it better....like the super muscle swartznager bee patties they sell in the books...lol...crush up some flintstone kids chewable vitamins or something an make a power patty they can use for da supa brood (snicker) for real tho...can this stuff be a decent sub for pollen if it was really neccisary to use it :|
     
  5. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    wait....which is better...the yeast or the flower...lol.
     
  6. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    an what happends if you usen the fatty flour....do ya get fuzzy little winged porkers ???
     
  7. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    2kooldad,they won't be able to get off the ground, :lol: sorry, i couldn't help it. :mrgreen: Jack
     
  8. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    lmbo....i can see it now....my bees bench pressing a hive tool....at least the ones that arent laying on the inner cover eating bon bons n honey cakes....either way they just might weigh to much to fly.....true sumter county porkers....they dont call this hog county for nuthen :) ....hmmmmmmmm
     
  9. rast

    rast New Member

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    This is Dave Miksa's recipe.

    We use 2 warm gal honey (24#), 1 gal hot H2O (8#), 50# sucrose, last ingredient to add mixing until a stiff glob like peanut butter 35-40# Megabee = TOTAL about 120#

    The dry Megabee replaces the soy flour and yeast, suppose to have right amino acids and so forth. The honey gets em to eat it and the sugar adds to it and helps hold it together.
    I just buy the Megabee patties.

    Now, (and I know Tec will not disagree) just because there is pollen coming in does not mean that it has nutritional value for bees. I prefer to give them a substitute early in the year and let them decide. Usually patties go fast (along with syrup) til the orange blossoms open. Then I don't want syrup or patties on them of course.
    Maples have started here by the way.
     
  10. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    really....some pollen is non benificial....i figured pollen was pollen cept for some added stuff....what i mean is....i just thought pollen itself was like a basic substance....each plant put its own extra spin on it but it was still pollen....intresting....i did know some pollens were bad.... Black ti ti an confederate jasmine....or is it the other ti ti....i dont have either ti ti round here but i do have the C. Jasmine.....well ima have to deal with strait up pollen cuz there is no way im affording to make that stuff....24 lbs of honey....yup i was done right there....lmbo !!!!
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    with what rast said... yes I do agree. if you suspect pollen is in short supply or is of questionable quality then adding something like pollen may have some benefit. almost without exception adding 'more sugar' to any pollen like product means it is taken up quicker.

    for almost everyone here you should consider downloading 'fat bee skinny bee' an outstanding reference produced in Australia in regards to the quality of pollen and the seasonal effect of pollen on the size (and likely health) of the bees themselves.

    and thanks very much rast for the Miksa's pollen substitute recipe. I noticed in an old article in the ABJ that they had a number of things they added to this and that and I did wonder at the time (and the article never said) what each of these additives was suppose to do????