Posted by Tourne in chat....

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Iddee, Oct 4, 2010.

  1. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    What am I seeing? Hive had been strong til last week now I see only larvae sizes about day 4 - 9. I also see small bees with only threads for wings and white on their heads. Some of the pupae seem dried out and calcified. Cannot see queen but presence of early pupae may indicate she is there. What's up with the "thread winged bees" and dried up larvae? I've not seen this in 30 years of beekeepingd. Dried up larvae
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    It sounds like a bad varroa infestation. Do a mite count and let's go from there. A sugar shake is the quickest way to do one.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    dried out and calcified sounds like chalk brood which is caused by a fungus, usually in the spring when things are wet, better ventilation will usually clear it up.

    thread winged bees sounds like deformed winged virus which is caused by varroa destructor mites.

    As Iddee suggested a sugar shake will show mite counts pretty quickly.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    deformed winged virus and chalkbrood* is what first came to my mind, although I think more information is definitely warranted to come to some positive conclusion.

    some questions:
    is the population still strong?

    do they have feed resources?

    is the young larvae being cared for?

    *I think there is more and more evidence since the CCD event that often times these maladies happen together and not as single entities.
     
  5. tourne

    tourne New Member

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    Thank you for your responses. Yes, I had considered chalk brood too, for that is what some of the cells look like.

    To answer a few questions:

    is the population still strong? Yes, but not as strong as about 2-3 weeks ago

    do they have feed resources? They have some but I shall feed them to get through the winter. We've had an 8 week drought (now broken) which really cut down on the nectar sources, I think.

    is the young larvae being cared for? - Cells are being covered so it would appear that nurse bees are doing their job.

    The hive seems much less defensive and active. Sort of demoralized (sorry, I've always anthropomorphized by "girls!").

    I shall check for varraroa and treat, if that's what I find.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    tourne writes followed by <tecumseh comment...
    is the population still strong? Yes, but not as strong as about 2-3 weeks ago
    <if it is chalk brood a few other diseases often time comes with this problem.
    do they have feed resources? They have some but I shall feed them to get through the winter. We've had an 8 week drought (now broken) which really cut down on the nectar sources, I think.
    <I suspect??? this is the hives primary problem. 8 weeks without anything coming in is a real stressor.
    is the young larvae being cared for? - Cells are being covered so it would appear that nurse bees are doing their job.
    <this bit of information likely eliminates nosema which classically elimantes the bees at the brood bee stage.
    The hive seems much less defensive and active. Sort of demoralized (sorry, I've always anthropomorphized by "girls!").
    <defensive behavior can also be a sign that a hive is having resource problem. anthropomorphism is ok here (I think??), I do it all the time. I think it suggest a certain affection for honeybees that is hard for some of us to express in any other way.

    ps... when you do the test do inform us of the results.