Potential Beekeeper in Eastern N.C.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Hog Wild, Jan 23, 2010.

  1. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    I am a newbie to the beekeeping world and have yet to begin acquiring anything related to beekeeping other than books. I am interested in starting with one hive that will be kept in my backyard. I live in a rural area with plenty of gardens, fruit producing trees/vines and commercial crops so I know the bees would have plenty to feed upon.

    A few questions I have, if someone would be kind enough to answer:

    I raise three strands of laying chickens, 24 head count - will my hive be in danger being in the same proximatey as my birds?

    I live 45 miles East of Raleigh, NC and was looking for Beekeeping suppliers in this area. Shipping charges from online suppliers are outrageous!

    10 frame versus 8 frame, which is better for a beginner?

    Thanks - Look forward to becoming a part of the forum!
    Dave Bradley
     
  2. beekeeperhelper

    beekeeperhelper New Member

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    Dave,
    You have found the very best forum for bee advice and nice people! I can't help with your second and third questions (my husband is the beekeeper and I just help) but I can attest that chickens and bees are quite compatible. We have a small flock of hens (only pets we ever had that produced anything!) and two hives. The outside coop is near the hives, and there is no predation, stinging, or fussing going on. I have been told that chickens will eat dead bees, but not live ones. I've never seen any of our hens eat bees, live or dead.
    You'll love beekeeping--it's fascinating and the honey is delicious!
     

  3. Bitty Bee

    Bitty Bee New Member

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    Hi hog wild. Me and my family are beekeepers down in the sand hills, near Fort Bragg. :wave:
    This is an awsome forum and I'm sure that anyone hear will be glad to help you with whatever you need.

    We have 23 different chickens, mostly muts, and they have never bothered the hives. Even when we let them free range.
    I think that they actually help with pest control! Mostly moths and beetles. I've never seen them eat bees, though.

    We've only had ten-frame hives, and they work well for us.
    I don't know much about 8 frame, but whatever your more comfortable with will be best for you to start with.

    As far as local suppliers go, Orr Bee Supply is out of Old Fort, NC, and I've heard lots of good things about them.
    We usually get our equipment from Idee though, so I can't help you much with that.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Free range chickens are the best wax moth control you can get. They will walk the hives at dusk, picking the moths off as they land or exit. They won't bother the bees, nor the bees them.

    Jack Tapp
    Busy Bee Apiaries
    Chapel Hill
    (919) 942-2006
    (919) 516-6621
    Authorized Brushy Mountain bee farm distributor
    Raises and sells Minnesota Hygienic Queens and spring nucs


    Watson Bee Supply
    Brushy Mountain distributor
    assembled & painted woodenware
    various bee supplies
    Welcome, NC
    336-731-6405

    !0 frame will be the most compatible with other beek's equipment, as you make beek friends and want to work together.
     
  5. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    Hi there HW :wave: Welcome to the board! I'm Baby Beek's mama and we have had chickens the whole time we've had the bees. The chickens never bother the bees at all and like Iddee told ya, they help the bees along in keeping down the pests.....our bees also like to borrow water from the chicken waterers in the summertime.

    As far as ten frame vs. eight. I was concerned about using ten frame hives being a sorta petite-ish gal, but they work out just fine for us, we did start using mediums and shallows for supers though after a summer flow with me hauling deeps off the tops of the hives. Now my boys are so much bigger than me it's their job anyway :yahoo:

    I hope you enjoy your bees, but be warned it's highly addictive and the next thing you know you'll be dreaming of multiple bee yards with 100s of hives. :mrgreen:
     
  6. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    Thanks for all of the quick responses! Glads to see that the chickens/bees co-exist. I can see that this forum is going to be a very good resource for my beekeeping endeavor...

    I have been making homemade wine for quite a while, homegrown & local fruits and kits "Addictive as well" - Anyone have any good meade recipes?

    Thanks again!
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Hello Hog Wild and welcome to the forum!!

    I would start out with two hives instead of one, that way you can compare one against the other.

    Find a local bee club to join or a mentor that is close by, they can really help you out.

    No need to be shy around here, and ask all kinds of questions.

    G3
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    howdy hog wild... and welcome.

    what's best 8 or 10 might depend more on your physical condition than anything else. 10 frame stuff is generally more available new and used.
     
  10. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    My chickens generally leave my bees alone, unless the bees are crawling on the ground in which case they snap them up pretty quick. The bees completely ignore my chickens, too.

    I started with 10 frame but like 8-frame better and wish I had started with 8-frame now. 8-frame is much easier on the ol back than 10 frame is, and even if your back is perfectly healthy like mine is, that can change pretty quick with a little too much strain put on it.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    another possible equipment choice for ya' is to go ALL 10 frame mediums (illinois depth supers). lesser weight due to the reduced height yet standard 10 frame in design.
     
  12. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    Thanks for all the information! I am planning a trip to Busy Bee over in Chapel Hill tomorrow and hopefully will come out of there with a better understanding of what I will need/want. I was also able to join a local BeeKeepers Association that meets every month and it just so happens they have an Intruductory to BeeKeeping course scheduled for every week in March. Timing was great!

    I am sure I will be back with more questions after my trip this weekend but ghopefully Jack will be on-site and answer alot of my questions.

    Thanks Again!
     
  13. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    You guy's were right about Jack!

    His set-up and advice cleared up alot of my questions and concerns. I ended up puchasing two cypress 10" hives, topper feeders, smoker, gloves etc. I purchasaed one super per hive for now, that should be sufficient for the 1st year shouldn't it? As far as painting the hives goes just use an exterior white latex?

    I am scheduled to get the package bee's from Jack in early April.

    Thanks!
     
  14. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Now you know why we recommend him. He's top notch.

    One super and one deep should make for a good brood chamber if you don't plan to split. Two deeps make it easier to split in your second year.

    Latex or oil exterior paint will do, it just takes oil base a bit longer to cure before using.
     
  15. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    I ended up purchasing two brood chambers for each with the intentions of splitting them off later. Jack had mentioned that Saturday so I just went ahead and got them while I was there.

    Do you use entrance reducers to keep larger insects and mice out of your hives?

    Hope to get the hives painted this weekend and then it will just be a waiting game for the new tenants!
     
  16. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I use entrance reducers to give the hive less entrance area to have to guard, against whatever may try to get in. It may just be bees from another hive trying to rob.
     
  17. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    entrance reducers or robbing screen are something good to consider if you are thinking about splitting later. most especially when a new split is not quite queen right they will limit loss due to robbing/loss of population.

    if you are splitting somewhere that has considerable bee density I would look into robbing screens since an entrance reducer in those kinds of locations (like here at my house for example) ain't going to get the job done.