Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a "Wanna Beekeeper". I first became "involved" with bees in 7th grade, when my teacher got one of those "see thru" hives. Note - this was a 4 room schoolhouse for grades 1-8.

Later my father raised/kept bees, about 7 hives.

So I've beekeeping in my background.

My predicament is I'm buying a house in NE Mississippi that is primarily in a mixed pine/hardwood (70/30) 15 yr old forest area.

Is there any general rule of thumb of how much meadow/garden area vs forested area is required within the 1 mile/2 mile limit?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,996 Posts
When I lived in southern MS., I had 7 acres of pines that abutted hundreds of acres paper company land. The ground under them was covered with gallberry bushes for miles. That is the best honey producing area I have ever lived in.

PS. Welcome to the forum.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,162 Posts
Welcome to the forum :wave:

Try to get the hives set up in full sun to help combat the small hive beetle.
The bees will find something to forage on, even the blackberry briars make good honey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
humm...

if the area is primarily piney woods with little open space then you may find maintaining bees a problem. basically and to cut to the chase somewhat a solid stand of pines is a bit like a desert to a honey bee and even the massive production of pollen is nearly worthless to the honeybee. hardwood (most especially the maples) do provide some bee pasture but generally do not persist long enough to ever capture a honey crop.

I would suggest you look for some pasture land and a riparian strip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
349 Posts
I live in the woods. My primary honey crop is tulip poplar. I'm looking into a site a few miles away with a nice stand of black locust. As tecumseh noted, the kinds of trees make all the difference. If it's mostly pine for miles around that less than ideal.

Here what I suggest, use this link, zoom into your exact location, and mark a 3-mile radius. Change to 'satellite' view, and you'll get a clear picture of the forage area for your bees:
http://www.freemaptools.com/radius-around-point.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
indypartridge said:
I live in the woods. My primary honey crop is tulip poplar. I'm looking into a site a few miles away with a nice stand of black locust. As tecumseh noted, the kinds of trees make all the difference. If it's mostly pine for miles around that less than ideal.

Here what I suggest, use this link, zoom into your exact location, and mark a 3-mile radius. Change to 'satellite' view, and you'll get a clear picture of the forage area for your bees:
http://www.freemaptools.com/radius-around-point.htm
GREAT maptool!!

It's about 50% pine plantation and 50% mixed hardwoods. But after review of the 2010 aerial imagery imagery (I had only viewed the Google before) it seems another large plot has been clearcut, thus for several years there will be a lot of "new growth" area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
Welcome to the forum. As G3farms said, try to situate your hives in direct sunlight to combat small hive beetles-but it's also a good idea to put them where they can get a little shade in the afternoon.
You should change the name of this thread from "potential" to "aspiring"
You are going about this in all the right ways. Find out ALL you can before acquiring your first bees. This forum is the place to do it. Do all the research you can.
I'm a first year beekeeper myself, and have learned more here in the last month than I had in more than a year of independant research. Don't be discouraged if you read 4 different answers from 4 different beekeepers to the same question. What works for me in Ohio may not be the same for G3 in Tennessee, Iddee in North Carolina, or you in Mississippi. It's a very friendly forum.
Good luck, and keep us posted.
Rodger
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top