Problem child hive:O

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by hlhart2001, May 10, 2014.

  1. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    I posted a few weeks back of finding a supersedure cell in my tiny overwintered hive...noticed it around April 9th, checked every 7 days and noticed it was gone by the 30th(although I can't remember what day I checked it the week before. I went in several days ago and couldn't find a queen, didn't see eggs(my eyes are so bad) so I just figured this hive was done for and thought about combining with one of my new hives(got 3 packages of Carnolians on 4/19, put them on 4.9 cell and they are going like gangbusters(lots of brood...). I didn't want to take any eggs/brood yet from these new hives to donate.
    Today I went into the problem child hive and now I see larvae..all together surrounded by a beautiful ring of pollen..but being the cynical person I am;)) I have a sneaking suspicion there could be a laying worker..the cells are not capped, but they have that bigger rounder look. I don't want to combine it if there is a laying worker and then screw up a Queen right hive.
    Should I just continue to wait until capped....and could I take from one of the package hives in a week or two and stick a frame of eggs in....and see what happens. I suppose I could just let them die out..I don't know...as the title says they are my problem child hive(but, I am kind of fond of those plucky girls)What would you do? Halley
     
  2. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    I would just wait it out a week and see what happens, sometimes the queen is small but works out well or she has problems at the start, I have 2 nucs where the queen is so skidish I have yet to see them, they tend to dive into the bottom of the box, if its a drone layer worker and you can steal 1 frame of eggs soon do it.
     

  3. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    Thanks, I am going to just wait and see...this is the little hive that could so we'll see what happens. If it is a laying worker I suppose I can just shake them all out and forget about them, move on and focus on the three I have. Also plan on putting out some bait hives..swarm season is coming up quickly where we live.
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Hi Halley
    As Zookeep has stated give them a week to see what happens. the larva will be caped proper or will be domed because the worker cells are filled with brood from the laying worker. then it will be easier to decide on a course of action. If the brood looks good all is well, if it is drone brood then this is where I disagree with zoo and most on the forum. Shake the bees out of the hive 100 feet away from the hives and let the bees find their way into and join the other colonies. the reason I say this is because the colony is queen-less it has been queenless for a while the bees in the hive are old and past the prime age for producing the food needed to produce good queens. the bees in the hive are older and it will take 30 days for new rased queen to be back in the hive and laying. Then another 21 days before her brood will emerge. This is 7 weeks and at this time of year the average life of a worker bee is 6 weeks. Let the bees go to where they can do some good now, Like in a week when you know for sure whether you have a laying worker or not.
     
  5. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    That's what I plan on doing...I saw double larvae(not eggs) in some of the cells.. can't be a good thing. Thanks, Halley
     
  6. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Double larva even the bees are not keeping their house in order because of the age of the population No young nurse in the hive. that said I have seen new queens deposit more than one egg in cells when the first start to lay so i would wait to see that the capping on the brood looks like before making your final discussion.