Problem having bees clean up entire frames of drone brood

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Crofter, Jun 30, 2013.

  1. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    When the bees clean out an entire frame of unemerged drone brood the amount dumped in front of the hive is astonishing. The smell is pretty disgusting and a lot of ants and flies are attracted and perhaps larger pests could be as well. I think I am going to go to a cut out panel and feed to my chickens. I have washed them out with a water hose but that gets a bit messy too. If there are bees busting to make wax perhaps it is not such a metabolic drain on hive resources to cull the wax as well.
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Why are they cleaning out the drone brood in the first place? Are these drone frames you have in the hive and are removing to kill the brood and then reinstalling to let the bees clean it up?

    If they are wanting to make wax, stack on a super for honey.
     

  3. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Yes, that one I froze and wire brushed the caps a bit. A full frame, both sides. IMG_0644.jpg IMG_0645.jpg
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Those look like foundationless frames that are cross wired.
     
  5. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    IMG_0569.jpg

    Yes, I have done some with wire and fishing line works good too. No pics of one but placed in the middle of the brood they draw it out worker size. They are 1 1/4 inch space. You could put 11 in a box if they were not mixed; with just the odd one in you wind up with a bit of extra space which is no blessing. I think they are drawn out quicker than a frame with wax foundation and in my experience much faster than plastic. It would be a strange mess though if you gave them a whole box at once! :lol:
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    That has to be one of the nicest frames of drone brood I've ever seen. :shock: :thumbsup:
     
  7. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Next week I am going to be putting an upper box on several hives and I will see if I can slip a foundationless comb in to see if they will draw it out worker brood sized. Maybe get some pics of it. I will have a mix of wax wired, plastic RiteCell and Mann Lake PF small cell frames. The good intentions were to install separately in different hives and do a comparison test. What with splitting, recombining, swapping, aiding and abetting etc., you can guess what happened to all those good intentions. I badly need a photographer and recording secretary to keep track of what, where and when.

    I think my son inherited a bit of it; last week he discovered he had grabbed a deep that was full of medium frames and put on for a honey super. Needless to say he got an early taste of honey from that box-- crush and strain style!
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "Next week I am going to be putting an upper box on several hives and I will see if I can slip a foundationless comb in to see if they will draw it out worker brood sized."

    frank, my guess is they won't draw out worker size cells, with foundationless, the cells will always be larger. i have not used "foundationless comb", but i have used empty frames placed in honey supers for comb honey production, placed between drawn combs (waxed peirco). these frames, and the cells are always drawn larger. makes for some nice comb honey. :grin:
     
  9. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Riverbee, do you think they draw larger cells for honey storage? I will be putting these in amongst other brood frames I pull up from the present 10 frame box. Won't likely have honey supers on those hives this year. Have not tried foundationless amongst the brood, only out near the edges deliberately expecting drone size. I am hoping to get mostly worker size if they already have ample drone space but nothing would surprise me.
     
  10. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Thinking about this, the placment of the comb in relation to the cluster of bees and brood will effect the cell size being drawn. In nature the bees build down producing new comb for the queen to lay in as they fill the comb above with honey as the brood emerges. If the foundation-less frames are placed under the brood the frames will be drawn down and out and the queen will move down to lay in the cells prompting the bees to build worker size cells. If placed above, the bees are going to build larger cell for the storage of honey cause less wax is needed to draw the comb.
    That's my thought on the subject, unproved theory, going on my observation of bees and the way they do things. the problem will be getting the bees to move down the 1 1/2" over the bottom bar, bee space, and top bar to start on the next super of frames.
     
  11. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I am sure it is warm enough now that I can split brood frames up over the two boxes and not worry about chilling brood. Also have 5 frame fillers so I dont have to dump 10 frames in on them. Will see if different positions in the hive make a difference in what they put for comb.
     
  12. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I put in a blank frame between two drawn frames in a deep super. The result was a perfectly drawn frame of drone brood cells. The queen made a trip up there a filled it with eggs. I think that they're quite desperate to make drones and will take any opportunity to do so. A queen excluder would have solved that, but I don't own any.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2013
  13. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "Riverbee, do you think they draw larger cells for honey storage?"

    frank i can't answer this question, i can't say that they do, and i can't say that they don't. i think a better resource/answer to this is for those who are foundationless in their brood boxes, or keep top bar hives. i think omie maybe on foundationless? and dave or adam foster collins on tbh's...