Pruning thornless blackberries

Discussion in 'The Rural Life' started by LtlWilli, Oct 16, 2009.

  1. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    I recall when pruning out deadwood in thorny brambles was an odious task at best. Stickers, nicks, and long scratches abounded.
    Now, I can go out and wallow on them if I care to, and they produce better than the stickery kind...Gotta love it! :D
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    AW, SHUCKS !!! That takes the fun out of taking the city kids out for their first picking. :p :lol:
     

  3. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    I am tempted to buy Chickashaw. They are thorny, but supposedly one of the best the University of Arkansas put out this year. They are the leader in blackberry research and improvement.
    Rick
     
  4. Redcrane

    Redcrane New Member

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    I grow Kiowa & Triple Crown. The Triple Crown ripen a month later, starting 1st of July, & produce larger berries.
     
  5. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    I have ...I heard that they are very good, too. ....If I only had more land... ;) ...I have 100 Arapahos, and they bear pretty good, but the thing is that they are two weeks earlier than any other tame berry. :yahoo:
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I have the triple crawn and am very happy with them, they bare heavy and are big and sweet. I let the Extension office talk me into planting the Apache blackberry plant (from Ark.) but after 3 years with them, they don't compare with the triple crown. They are sweet and bigger but don't bare that heavy. I truck farm and have an acre of blackberries. I'm going to put out 200 of the Chester variety this spring, they are like the triple crown but hold longer. Jack
     
  7. Bitty Bee

    Bitty Bee New Member

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    We've never grown blackberries. The wild ones grow like weeds in our area and produce wonderful without any work on our part, except picking. We just have to try to keep the kudzu off of them.
     
  8. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    They do produce well Baby, but imagine picking tons of blackberries without stooping over and looking at the ground all day in 90 degrees ......and without the kevlar sleeves!
     
  9. Bitty Bee

    Bitty Bee New Member

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    That would be nice!
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Stooping over??? Are you sure you don't have dewberries? We have blackberries you need a step ladder to get to. They go 10 and 12 feet high here.
     
  11. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    Nope I'm not sure at all. I've tasted those and the ones on upright brambles and they taste the same to me.
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If it is a vine running on the ground, and the berry is round rather than oblong, and the kernels are large, they are dewberries.
     
  13. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    LOL, okay....is that the only difference? They taste the same and we use them interchangeably.
     
  14. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I have mine in rows on a wire fence, i plant the rows 10ft. apart and sow Dutch Clover between the rows for the bees.If you mow it when the blooms start to turn brown it will bloom all summer. I like picking blackberrirs this way better, when i was a kid my brothers and i would go to the fields and pick them, we always got a good load of ticks and chiggers and kept a eye out for copperheads. We felt it was worth it though when mom made thoes blackberry cobblers :yahoo: . Jack

    p.s. Gooseberries to :thumbsup: .
     
  15. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    Thanks for the info Jack! I've considered planting some but hesitated since they are VERY available wild to us right now. I may get to it one of these days though since now you have my curiosity peaked. Me and Baby Beek make blackberry jelly every year, and cobblers too. When I was a kid we would have them with ice cream for dessert, with cream and sugar for breakfast, and by the handful all day long. My Grandma made blackberry syrup and dried the leaves to make "stomach tea" in the winter months.....nothing fixes a case of the "scoots" as quickly or pleasantly!

    I used to go pick gooseberries too! That is another one of my favorite things to do, but I can't say as I enjoy eating those near as much.

    Where in MO is your area if you don't mind me asking?? I'm from the area around Stanton/Sullivan/Bourbon and grew up going back and forth between there and the Williamsburg/Fulton/Columbia area. Ended up having lived all over the state except for the far south corners.....never did find too many places around there that I didn't like either!
     
  16. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Mama Beek,first off i'm sorry to hear about your mothers condition. Fair Grove is 12 miles N. of Springfield, Mo. the SW. part of Mo. My wife and i use to go two the German Fest at Herman, Mo. in Oct. but haven't made it the last two years. (kind of in your area) When i was on the Mo. State Water patrol back in 1968 or 1969? i was sent to Hannibal to patrol the streets in my patrol boat when the river flooded. (watching for looters) also, kind of in your area. I like the thornless blackberries, they have improved them alot. The first ones i remmber were the Black satin,variety and you couldn't put enough sugar on them to make them sweet. The triple crown and Chester varieties are big and sweet,and being thornless my wife likes to pick them. :thumbsup: Jack
     
  17. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    I may have to see if Baby Beek and I can get some of those growing here. I wonder if they would do well here with the sand and mega-humid super heated summers? How much space do they require? Do they require a lot of work, time and attention wise? Baby Beek has big dreams of us running a mini farm and road stand here on a little over 2 1/2 acres that is usable for growing so these thornless berries might be worth looking into.

    Back when we were a young couple with no children my husband would take me to the Ocktoberfest in Hermann, I usually enjoyed the ride there more than the festivities though. That's a beautiful area all through that stretch too. We lived in Canton for a few years and I worked in Hannibal....small world. My baby brother lives in Springfield and used to tell me all the time I ought to come live in that part of the state since I hadn't done it yet. God sure did do a beautiful job when he made Missouri didn't he.
     
  18. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Mamabeek, blackberries like hot weather and i don't think sandy soil would be a problem (take a soil test). After you get your fence up and your plants planted in a row 5ft. apart, they don't take much maintance.You won't get many berries the first year and you have to tie them to the wirers to keep the wind from breaking the new canes off.The next year after they bare, you have to cut the old canes out that bared ( and i burn them) and i put 6-24-24 fert. on them in the fall and straight Nit. fert. in the spring. I don't spray mine with anything but you do have to watch for cane bores. Last year blackberries were going for $20.00 a gal. and we couldn't keep up with the demand.I don't really look at anything i like to do as work, it's just something to do. Jack
     
  19. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    $20 a gallon!!! :shock: Wow, we will have to start planning our new blackberry patch! Amazing!

    We don't treat doing the things we like to do as work, but it sure is nice when it pays off!