pulling all supers and going through brood boxes

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Sep 10, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I am in process of pulling all supers and checking both brood boxes. I watched a video that showed a guy getting his deeps ready for winter. He was putting all full frames of honey to the outside and moving all brood to the lower box. Then putting all the empty comb above the brood so they can fill with fall nectar.

    I started doing this yesterday to my hives, and here is what I noticed.

    All hives have all the brood in the upper deep and the lower deeps are pretty much empty, except for bees being down there. BUT, it looks like as the brood hatches in the upper deeps they are filling those vacated cells with nectar.

    Won't this push the queen down to the empty lower deep to lay and leave the upper deep full of honey for winter. It would be a lot less work on my part and less chance of hurting the queen.

    Goldenrod is has been blooming for about a week now.

    Here is the video I watched.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8kAzdKWp3k
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Bees will always store honey above and around the brood. If there isn't enough to fill the super, then the brood will be up there. As you seen, the brood moves down as the stores come in. They will never store honey below the brood.
     

  3. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    So, is it helping to go ahead and move the brood down now and put the empty frames in the top deep above the brood?

    With goldenrod blooming I am wanting them to store everything in the brood chambers and not in the supers.
     
  4. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    Good question, Yankee. I've been pondering the same thing, and I too have been seeing the brood comb being backfilled with nectar in the upper deep. In addition to the arrangements you suggest, I was going to put all uncapped honey in the supers above the inner cover so they can move it down to the deeps.
     
  5. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Here is another question I thought of that goes along with pulling the supers.

    Can you cause them to go into swarm mode by pulling the supers.

    I pulled supers from clover field out yard this evening. After pulling the supers I lifted the 2 deeps and they are heavy, heavy. I didn't have time to go into
    them but they are solid. So, on my way home i was think of where are they going to put all the goldenrod during the fall.

    So, I know I need to go back and look through the deeps but I know they have lot of honey in them. What do i do if they are already full?
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip...
    'I am in process of pulling all supers and checking both brood boxes. I watched a video that showed a guy getting his deeps ready for winter. He was putting all full frames of honey to the outside and moving all brood to the lower box. Then putting all the empty comb above the brood so they can fill with fall nectar.'

    >this is exactly what I do. I do this for two reasons: 1) it doesn't allow you to deceive yourself into thinking there is anything of food value in that bottom box and 2) on occasion I have noticed that since the bottom box is largely unattended that wax moth can get a foot hold here at the bottom of the stack and push the bees right out the top of the box <this can be viewed as a form of swarming although more exactly it is absconding from the predation of wax moth.

    another snip..
    'Can you cause them to go into swarm mode by pulling the supers.'

    >not usually, although I like to keep a bit of extra space on anything that has a large population just so if a good fall flow does occur (which is rare here and is somewhat predictable based on rainfall) you have the opportunity to capture some of this flow. most fall honey I don't even think about extracting and selling but come winter time a frame a feed to spread around here or there can have significant value.

    ps.... a lot of times with hives like you described above I can typically tell by simply tipping the hive that both boxes are heavy although most time I will crack the two boxes apart and peek below. the feel of the unit really tells you all you need to know <which is to say when you tip a double deep hive if the bottom is empty the unit feels top heavy.
     
  7. cheezer32

    cheezer32 New Member

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    For the most part I like to let the bees set up the hive the way they want. The only thing I do is try to make sure that for the cluster size they are given the appropriate space. ie if a single isn't up to par, population wise never by amount of stores, they I will reduce it to a single, and doubles to singles etc. That's all I do.