Purchasing queens?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by arkiebee, May 9, 2010.

  1. arkiebee

    arkiebee New Member

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    I got 2 nucs from my fellow beekeeper schoolteacher - she has excellent - healthy bees, and when she makes her splits, she puts new purchased queens in them. Usually she goes ahead and does that, but this time I brought the bees home and got the queens 2 days later. I installed them Friday afternoon.

    My question(s) is/are... These queens look small - her supplier is a reputable supplier, but I just thought that new queens would be bigger? :confused:

    Second question - I installed these queens Friday, would it be too early to check and see if they are released today? (2nd day)? :confused:

    and Third question - if the hive released her and didn't like her - how exactly would I know that she is dead? :confused:

    and by golly I thought of a Fourth question - I went ahead and put one of these purchased queens in one of my splits - would it be too soon to add a new hive body because I just split a hive in half (I knew where my queen was) and this hive body (really 2 supers) is full of bees, brood, etc. :confused:

    I think I am done with questions....for now! ;)
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    New queens are small. They will grow after they start laying regularly.

    I leave them alone for 7 days. Then I look for eggs. Some check them on the 3rd or 4th day and then sometimes wait for 2 weeks for eggs. I like my way better.

    Adding another hive body won't hurt, if you don't have a SHB problem.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    let me assume you are currently into a nice flow and the split in question has a good population of field bees....

    if the split is crowded??? it would be better to add a hive body now than to risk the workers backfilling the brood nest before the new queen is released and ready to lay.

    small queens... as Iddee says very new queens are smallish. this somewhat to highly depends on how long she was allowed to lay in the mating box in which she was reared. some producer catch queens after they have only laid a small patch and other like to let them get about their business a bit longer. If you should acquire a 'new queen' from a producer very early in the season and she is fully formed then you might suspect she is not this season's queen. like 'that' ain't ever happened before.
     
  4. arkiebee

    arkiebee New Member

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    Thanks so much guys - that is info I did not know about new queens - I haven't even read that anywhere in my bee books. All of these queens are "smallish" - and I know they were queens because the bees shipped with them were on the outside and they were all over the queen cages.

    the split I made was from 2 medium supers where the queen just HAD to lay eggs in. I have quite a few bees in there and I was going to put an empty hive body on it pretty quick as soon as I know the queen is out.

    We are currently in a big time honey flow - we have clover like I have never seen before. Now these next few days we are in for a cool & rainy streak here in northcentral AR - so I may just be able to "peek under the hood" between rain clouds.

    I have now went from 6 hives to 10 - doesn't the saying go that if you have 20 hives - it is no longer a hobby??? I know this time of year and working a day job at the same time and having a farm - I think 6 hives is no longer a hobby - but I love my bees so I'll do it! :D