put my hives where a pollinator had his hives

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by adamant, May 22, 2012.

  1. adamant

    adamant Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    i keep bees on a farm with another bee keeper . tonight he took his hives out (10) and left a a lot of bees behind! i was tending to my bees and the farmer approached me and asked what will happen to those bees.. i said they will die! so i had the idea to bring over a week hive in the spot he had his there.. do you think i will draw some of his in?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Definitely....
     

  3. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hey, nice catch! Hope your weak hive is beefed up good with all those free bees!
     
  4. Marbees

    Marbees Member

    Messages:
    983
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Just do it:grin: It's an old trick to strengthen a weak hive.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    His loss is your gain! :thumbsup: Always a good practice (where possible), when moving hives is to leave one behind giving all the stragglers someplace to go. :mrgreen:
     
  6. adamant

    adamant Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    it was after dark when i did it. will they still find the hive after dark? next day? how long should i keep it there? lol its in a area that i think he is interested in plowing..
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    They won't find it in the dark, but the next few days should still have them homing in to the spot. Two or three days should sufice for you to collect all the "lost" stragglers. Then, move your hive at night, when they are all at home.
    Make sure you move it far away (at least 5 miles), enough so that they won't find their way back to the same site again and you too will lose them. Put some weeds or twigs in front of the entrance so the bees will notice that something has changed when they go out in the morning to forage. This is supposed to help them realize that their "autopilot" has to be reset.
    If the location where you want to settle the hive is less than five miles away, you'll have to do the move in two stages:
    First, to a temporary site over five miles away for a week or two
    Then, back to the closer, final spot.
    All moves must be done at night, otherwise you lose all those bees that are away foraging.
    :rules:
     
  8. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Good idea. Hope that works out for you and the weaker hive.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    the more hives the merrier or at least the more robust you catcher hive will be..

    a long time ago in a fairly remote spot in East Texas I set down 12 hives along a fence line in a place where we loaded multi semi with bees (typically about 500+ hives at a time). prior to this I purchased 12 laying queens and set their introduction cages into the empty hive bodies. I then left them there for about a month and a half and when I returned I had 12 of the most populated hives you can imagine.

    a lot of folks that move bees on a regular bases and who use the same spots year after year set down catcher hives to keep the problem of lost bees down to some minimum.