putting queen in a display hive for a few hours

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Sep 9, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I am doing a presentation at a elementary school next Tuesday morning. I have built a display hive that holds one deep and one medium frame.

    My question is, would it be a problem to put a frame of capped brood with the queen on it in this display hive. She would be missing from the hive
    for several hours.
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Have done this lots of times and have never had a problem. They may have missed her, but she is has not been gone long enough for them to forget her or her pheromones.
     

  3. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Thanks Apis,

    I'll put her in there so the kids can see her.
     
  4. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    1. Assuming that in addition to the capped brood, the frame has honey and workers and not just the queen by herself. She needs attendents to care for and feed her.
    2. When travelling with the queen (and the bees) in the display hive, avoid letting the setup be exposed to direct sunlight for any extended period of time. Behind the glass the heat can build up quickly and the bees are unable to control the temperature like they would inside a regular hive. The best way to attend to this is to have cardboard flaps cut to the right size, that you can tie/tape over the glass while outdoors or in the car.
     
  5. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Thanks Ef.

    Yea, the display hive I built holds one deep frame and one medium frame above that. I did cut 2 one inch vent holes on all 4 sides and covered them with
    hardware cloth. I do keep them covered.

    Funny,
    first time I used it this past spring, had a frame in it that had a capped queen cell. I took that instead of the queen. I brought display home and sat in garage til the next day. Woke up and the queen had hatched out in there. I cut another hole in the side bottom and sat it outside. She flew out got mated and returned. When she started laying I moved them to a nuc, That was petty fun to watch happen.
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Yankee,
    ​You remind me of some of the observations I made with my observation hive in my early beekeeping days. The one I built holds four full frames, one above the other. I had it placed in my storage shed, up against the wall with an exit hole for the bees to use. I would sit for hours inside, watching them in action as they came and went. It was then that I first saw a virgin queen come back from a mating flight with the lucky (?) drone's "equipment" still attached to the tip of her abdomen. On arrival, the workers quickly went to attend to her and cleaned off what didn't belong to her.