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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why, oh why, will my Q-less hive not take the cells I have given it. They've been Q-less for about 4 weeks now, no sign of eggs, brood, etc. I gave them a cell yesterday and the tore it open. Granted this is from my first grafting attempt, so maybe they can detect a poor queen and destroy her? It's all I can think of. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

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Most queen breeders candle queen cells before installing them. They find a number of dead ones as a normal routine. I would give them another one and/or a frame with eggs and larva.
 

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Most queen breeders candle queen cells before installing them. They find a number of dead ones as a normal routine. I would give them another one and/or a frame with eggs and larva.
I still don't have a queen with the swarm I took a month ago. I can't buy queens.
What do I have to do to get a queen from another beekeeper. How to and when to move from another beekeepers hives. Try and get a frame with eggs and larvae from someone else?
 

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CeeGee- How do you know they were queenless 4 weeks ago?- did you remove their queen then?

It might take about 4 weeks for them to make a new queen and have her start producing brood larvae that you can notice. Could be they already have a new queen who is just beginning to lay eggs. That would also explain why the queen cell you put in was destroyed.

Dakine- when you obtain a frame with eggs, be sure you get it into the hive as quickly as possible- a half hour trip in an air conditioned truck cab would be no good- keep the frame warm and protected and rush it gently to the hive so the eggs don't get chilled.
 

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CeeGee- How do you know they were queenless 4 weeks ago?- did you remove their queen then?

It might take about 4 weeks for them to make a new queen and have her start producing brood larvae that you can notice. Could be they already have a new queen who is just beginning to lay eggs. That would also explain why the queen cell you put in was destroyed.

Dakine- when you obtain a frame with eggs, be sure you get it into the hive as quickly as possible- a half hour trip in an air conditioned truck cab would be no good- keep the frame warm and protected and rush it gently to the hive so the eggs don't get chilled.
Thanks you guys/gals
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Omie (et.al.) No, I did not remove the queen - they blew over in a wind storm in early April, and they havent had any brood since what I salvaged emerged. I though maybe a recently mated queen too, one I missed in my search a week later, but they've got that 'roar' going, they're not really 'motivated' (if you know what I mean) and they're fierce.
But now I'm beginning to think they must have a queen. Why else would they destroy their salvation?
I can give them a frame of open, but this has become a sort of experiment to my newly attempted grafting.
I had no idea about the candling either -
Thanks all!
 

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a snip..
I can give them a frame of open, but this has become a sort of experiment to my newly attempted grafting.
I had no idea about the candling either -

tecumseh:
candling is you look thru the cell with a candle or small light bulb behind to see if the pupae inside the queen cell is moving/turning.

in this circumstance giving a hive of bees unsealed brood can accomplish two things... 1) it gets some of the workers to tending the brood and this then somewhat settles the hive and 2) quite often at the point where a new queen is fixing to lay. open brood (and I think likely the brood bees themselves) orient the queen to begin laying adjacent to this frame.

your time line would suggest to me that Omie's comments are exactly correct.
 
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