Queen Cage

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Flyman, Dec 12, 2012.

  1. Flyman

    Flyman New Member

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    There is current research that indicates shipping queens in JzBz style cages is damaging their Tarsal pads and thus causing early supercedure. Does anybody have real life experience that would collaborate this research. I'm thinking of changing back to 3 hole Benton cages just to be sure. Queens need all the help they can get.
     
  2. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Could be? Seems like for the last five years 25% of the queens i order are superseded within the first two months, for one reason or another? Jack
     

  3. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I read somewhere that the 3 hole cages were better, but darned if I can remember where I read it.
    Gypsi
     
  4. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    I only have experience with the 2 packages I began with in 2011- both queens were in little 3- hole wooden boxes and both were superseded within a few weeks of installation.
     
  5. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Queen Cage Design

    Many year's ago, an experienced keep told me that some designs of Q cage allowed the outside bees access to the Q's feet which they chewed. He recommended a Nicot style Q cage which allowed the Q to hide until the bees accepted her smell and her.

    I regret I am not familiar with a JzBz cage.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    hope to see you on the way to LA prior to Christmas. Are you folks going to be home?

    I think I will toss this question off to Danny Weaver to see what he thinks.

    ps... where did the research come from?
     
  7. Flyman

    Flyman New Member

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    We will be around....come on up. Research was posted in ABJ or BeeCulture in Oct or November....will try and find it. I think it was a CAP project.
     
  8. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I am very interested in this queen cage issue. I am looking into rearing queens and eventually breeding them. shipping issues are critical in my opinion. I have at least twice seen that the JzBz have serious issues. That stinks because looking at cages and systems they are my favorite.

    I saw a study not to long ago that indicated wooden cages are best. I cannot recall where I saw the report though.

    I have also seen the comment of a place for the queen to hide several times.

    Anyway I really need to set down and look at the various cages and make a final choice.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    well just to let you know DanielY all the queens I have sold I place in three hole cages. I do buy a number of queens in plastic cages and have never noticed a problem. Like a lot of things there are + and - to any choice you might make.
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    If you decide on wooden cages, be sure and go with the 3 hole type versus any other. There is a name for the other style wooden cage (California or Western perhaps?) that I would avoid at all costs. I did in a queen with one, my fault but the design did not help.

    queen cages 001.jpg queen cages 002.jpg
     
  11. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    I installed over 50 queens last year with the California style cages with no problems. I've also installed many queens with the JzBz style cages with no problems. I think it's the quality of the queen most times, not the package.
     
  12. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    The only good way to really tell that I can think of would be to rear say 200 queens. cage 100 in three hole and 100 in another type cage and then release them. measure the results. Rinse and repeat for say about 10 repetitions. you would then be close to getting a good idea.

    The three hole works well for me because if nothing else I have a full shop. already have the bits required and a drill press. Is that just plain old fiberglass window screen used on them? I found a 7 foot by 3 foot roll of it the other day. Plus it is far cheaper than #8 mesh.

    I know it is hardly worth making your own. same with frames. But for me right now I need as much to be no additional cash cost as possible.
     
  13. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Most use an aluminum or steel screen because it only requires a staple on each end to hold it onto the queen cage.
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would I said All in Apisbees above post.

    I would say in about 99% of the cases if I am installing queens I have purchased from my neighbor down the road I really prefer the jzbz cages since they do not have attendants and they are easy to install. of course in this particular case the queen is not in the cage longer than perhaps 2 days max. when I ship queens (and I think this applies to my queen rearing neighbor also) I always use 3 hole wood cages.
     
  15. Flyman

    Flyman New Member

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    I bought a bunch of 3 hole cages from Kelley. The screen supplied is definitely wire. Not #8, just normal screen - like from a screen door. I have some plastic screen here and looked at it. It is pretty flimsy. Don't think it would secure well with just a staple at each end. It also may be the plastic causing the problem but you would think this is counter-intuitive. There may be sharp edges on the inside of JzBz cages left from molding. Would probably need a microscope to see the issue though.

    For Daniel Y....the research I read did exactly as you described but I don't think the sample size was that large. I want to remember 100 total with a supercedure rate of about 60% in 2 months.

    I will try and find the research and be more definitive.