Queen Cell Confusion Too!

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by indigoeye, Jun 11, 2011.

  1. indigoeye

    indigoeye New Member

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    We kinda have a queen cell confusion question too. We found about 10-12 capped queen cells in a hive only 4 weeks old. It has a very low population so we kinda are assumming that the girls are not happy with thier queen and plan to replace her. But should we leave all the queen cells or remove some of them? I am posting the link to our Youtube video from our inspection of this hive today.http://www.youtube.com/user/AFTERBURN001#p/a/u/0/Z-z_4pDn8zA (sorry it is kinda long)

    Our second hive is doing awsome. I am so glad we decided to get 2 hives to compare. And bees from 2 different suppliers. It has been really educational to observe how different they are to each other.

    Thanks for any info!!

    Michelle & Mark
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I wouldn't know which ones to remove, so I would let the bees decide. They will choose one and remove the rest.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    10 to 12 sounds more like emergency than superscedure queen cells???? is there any uncapped brood in the hive?

    unless I had some use for them (you can cut out cells on straight bee wax foundation) I would leave the cells. given the circumstance is unknown in why the cells were built harvesting such cells would likely be poor advice... that is you are actively selecting from a queen which may have some unforeseen or unknown problem.
     
  4. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    There are uncapped brood in the hive. I am also leaning in the direction of leaving them but my wife (Michelle) also contacted the president of our local beekeeper association and he said we should remove them. LOL, I guess there is no definitive answer when your are trying to work with mother nature.

    Question: From what you see in the video, given that it is only week 4 since we installed these bees into a brand new hive (no comb) is a frame and a half of brood poor, average good...? I ask this because we started our second hive nine days later and they already have two full frames capped. Hive #1 (the hive in question) are Russians hive #2 are Italian/Carniolan Hybrids.

    Mark
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Removing queen cells is the best way I know to make a hive hopelessly queenless. The bees have decided the old queen is leaving, one way or the other. That is a fact. Now, you can let them raise one, or remove their attempts and the hive will die without a queen.
     
  6. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I would leave the queen cells in place.

    Not questioning your club president (well I guess I really am) but did he give a reason to cut the cells out?

    If you do remove them and the hive becomes queenless what is your next step?

    answer...buy a mated queen and introduce her hoping they will accept her, rob a frame of eggs from your other hive so that they will make some emergency queen cells (basically the same time frame where you are at now, except you are at day 9 to 16 with your cells (if they are capped) and it will take from egg to egg laying queen 30 to 35 days and another 21 days for the new queens eggs to hatch).

    Remember, each day they go with out a queen the weaker they are getting and from the looks of things this hive is not all that strong.
     
  7. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    Thanks for the replies!
    G3farms: The hive has a queen and she is laying but as others have mentioned, Maybe the bees know something we don't.

    His explanation for cutting them out was a concern that the population was too low to start over.

    Here's his quote:
    "This package cannot afford to loose this queen, hatch out a new queen, and
    wait another month to start getting workers from a new queen. Also, the
    hive cannot afford to have the queen swarm away with any of the
    population."

    Thanks for all the help!
    Mark
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    well then food for thought..........
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A hive won't swarm if they don't have a high population. Abscond maybe, but not swarm.