Queen escaped!

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Barbie, May 12, 2011.

  1. Barbie

    Barbie New Member

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    Saturday I put a new queen with her subjects into a hive, when I went out Sunday there she was crawling around the outside of a hive. Tonight if the weather holds I will go into the hive and check for any eggs, but I am not sure what I did wrong outside of she was released too early. If the hive is queenless, where do I go from there?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If you purchased a package, then yes, she was released too soon. She should not be released for a minimum 2, preferably 3 days. Hopefully, when you found her, you put her back in the hive.

    If that happened Sat., you should have eggs by now. If not, you can order a new queen and introduce her over a period of days, or if you have other hives, you can take a frame with eggs from another hive and give to the queenless one. They will raise a queen.
     

  3. Barbie

    Barbie New Member

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    Checked the hive this afternoon. The bees were very docile; however, I did not see any eggs nor a queen. I am not very good at seeing either, but I thought that if the hives were queenless they would not be as docile?
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You should be safe in waiting until Monday. Then you should have large larva that is easily seen.

    If not, you may want to buy a queen and introduce her.

    Also, watch the bees entering from the field. If they are carrying a lot of pollen, she is likely there.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    are you feeding this package/hive?
     
  6. Barbie

    Barbie New Member

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    I am feeding them...
     
  7. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Welcome to the forum barbie. You couldnt find a nicer group of people to associate with in a beekeeping forum. Im going to go out way out on a limb here. Im wondering if just by chance the package was sent with a virgin queen and she had just came back from or getting ready to go on a mating flight. Highly unlikely but possible. My moneys on the long shot bet there will be eggs and larva in there the next time you take a peak
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip...
    The bees were very docile

    tecumseh:
    the best of signs are 1) the workers appear settled and 2) the generally go about their business without appearing nervous.

    eggs and larvae will be difficult to see on new comb/foundation. once the egg has gone to the larvae stage and the workers will begin to feed the new brood and the glistening reflection of feed in the bottom of the cells is much easier to see. you really don't need to see either eggs or larvae directly just the sheen of feed in a patch.

    feeding encourages egg laying and is ESSENTIAL in a package of bees since they have no resources to fall back upon... feeding also makes the amount of evidence much easier to see (ie the patch of brood larger).

    good luck...
     
  9. Barbie

    Barbie New Member

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    Too cold, rainy & windy to open the hive and look today. 46 degrees, brrrr I thought it was May!