Queen Excluders

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by crazy8days, Jun 11, 2012.

How many people use a Queen excluder and if do what type of material.

Poll closed Jun 15, 2012.
  1. I use a queen excluder-Wood

    4 vote(s)
    20.0%
  2. I use a queen excluder-plastic

    2 vote(s)
    10.0%
  3. I use a queen excluder-metal

    11 vote(s)
    55.0%
  4. I do not use a queen excluder

    7 vote(s)
    35.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I know this will open a can of worms but I'm torn between using one and not. So, thought I would just do a poll. If you want to comment please do.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Yes and no! :grin:
    No excluders until I find evidence of laying in my honey supers, and then they go on if I find any. The queen does not like laying in clean white comb honey supers but once she finds her way up there, look out. And once there has been a cycle of brood on those frames she will use them readily if no excluder is put on.
    I also look to see if there is a natural honey barrier in the top deep to see if that will work for me instead of an excluder.
     

  3. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    Being a newbee on a tight budget, I decided not to buy anything until I determine I really need it. I'm starting without an excluder. I don't want to blow $20 on something that will spend the next 20 years in the corner of my shop. If I find that I am having trouble getting any honey without one, then I may buy one.
     
  4. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    :thumbsup: DITTO
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    i am with perry on an answer. yes and no, i use queen excluders. until there is a honey barrier to keep the queen from laying in the super she will. if there is foundation in the super above the brood nest, i place no excluder on until the frames are drawn, then it goes on, and stays on until a honey barrier or two are in place. in the spring i will place them on until the super is a honey barrier. sometimes i don't remove them.

    used properly, my experience has been that queen excluders are not 'honey excluders'. personally, i do not like my queens laying in my supers, and/or the bees building drone comb in them, its annoying, but it happens. i have left q/e's on hives and harvested 180 lbs of honey from a hive.
    some queens and bees are more persistent and stubborn in some years than others, it's all in your management:grin:
     
  6. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    Im using them in some but not in others, all depends on the hive, some queens just seem to stay in the bottom 2 brood boxes without any help from me, others seem to go right for the top box:lol:
     
  7. 11Nick

    11Nick New Member

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    I don't think this is hi-jacking the thread. Crazy8 said he is is torn about using one or not. It is my hope to try to settle a question I have while hopefully giving Crazy8 food for thought. I've asked this question several ways on different forums. Either I'm stupid and am not understanding the answers that are being given to me, or people are just not giving me satisfactory answers......
    I understand bees may be hesitant to cross the QE. And even after they draw comb above the QE, it will at very least slow down the workers as they carry the honey up into the supers.... meaning slower honey production. Hence the term "honey excluder".
    BUT, what if you use top entrances year round and maintain a minimal lower entrance? The QE goes on in the spring after the deeps are full and you add the first super. The foragers are not being effected by the QE at all, are they? Can anyone speak from personal experience who uses this setup? Do you still consider it a honey excluder?
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    Nick,
    my opinion is use them, they are valuable. i do not call them honey excluders, never have, never will, other's do. bees are hesitant to go through an excluder to draw foundation in a super full of wax coated foundation, and this is true. i stated in an earlier post, 180 pds of honey or more from a hive with a queen excluder on from spring, this is not 'slowing down the workers or slow honey production', and this is common for me. i use top entrances cut out in my inner covers and widened out, and leave the bottom entrance wide open, and sometimes for good measure i notch queen excluders to allow foragers easier access to the honey supers. :eek:

    from my personal experience and quirks over the years, it works.

    in the spring, and every spring, (depending on the strength of the hive and the laying queen and divides), the q/e's go on. i decide who gets one and who doesn't, and why. for the most part, they all get them. sometimes they are removed and sometimes they are not. this has yet to affect my honey production. this may be different in a different climate or area with lack of forage that my bees have available.

    you said: "I've asked this question several ways on different forums. Either I'm stupid and am not understanding the answers that are being given to me, or people are just not giving me satisfactory answers......"

    you are not stupid. best i can say is you have to decide what works for you to form an opinion from your own experience with these. advice is just that, advice.....formed from each beeks experience and methods.

    the answer to your question lies in your own experience and not someone else's opinion. if you have more than one hive, experiment and try it out, and not for just one season. hope this answers your question.
     
  9. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    I only use a queen excluder in queen rearing in the finisher hive.
     
  10. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    I don't believe "Do you use an excluder?" is a good question. A better question would be "What do you use an excluder for?" Or, perhaps, "What are your favorites uses for an excluder?"

    I think we've had some threads on this before. I typically don't put excluders between the broodnest and honey supers, but do find them useful when making up nucs, when wanting to confine a queen to single box, when looking for a particularly hard-to-find queen, confining a swarm, etc.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a riverbee snip...
    the answer to your question lies in your own experience and not someone else's opinion. if you have more than one hive, experiment and try it out, and not for just one season. hope this answers your question.

    tecumseh:
    excellent response. 1) how things work out can vary depending on location and 2) a valid experiment requires more than one replication to be in any way valid.

    how you set up a hive (top and bottom entrances) has a significant part in whether a queen excluder does or does not reduce a honey crop.
     
  12. 11Nick

    11Nick New Member

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    I think this is my problem. Either I didn't ask a properly worded question, or the past threads that I've searched up were not specific to my question.
    Another part to my problem is that I don't have hives. It was my intent to have hives up and running by now. I did my homework in preparation for me and my kids to get some hives. Then my wife got sick and we had to put bees on the back burner. Now that life is back on track, we are too far through the current year to get hives and stand a reasonable chance of getting them through winter.
    My point is that everything I think about, read about, or ask/discuss on here is all hypothetical according to what I've learned to this point.
    But back to the excluders: Nearly all the discussion to be read on excluders involves bottom entrances. By my choice, I will use top entrances when I put hives together in the spring. I find that many beeks using bottom entrances have much criticism of QE's, and as I said in my last post... it seems very logical to my why (slows down transportation of honey within the hive). But it seems that the use of top entrances would take this problem out of the equation. I can't recall a single thread regarding success or failure of QE's with top entrances, though, because it seems top entrances themselves are not a commonly used set up.
    I perhaps need to start another thread quizzing those who do or have used top entrances; and what are THEIR experiences with QE's.

    Again.... Crazy8.... hope I didn't hijack the thread, and I hope you get the info you are looking for.
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    11nick, if you don't have a bottom entrance under the QE, how are the drones going to get out?
     
  14. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I was just about to type that and I see you beat me to it Iddee.
     
  15. 11Nick

    11Nick New Member

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    I intended on using them, too. My assumption was that the biggest part of the force would use the top, while the bottom would be used by drones, house-cleaning, and other foragers who wanted to take the scenic route. But then again, that was my assumption. They do check with me to verify my plans, right?
     
  16. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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  17. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    nick says:
    "the bottom would be used by drones, house-cleaning, and other foragers who wanted to take the scenic route."
    and i am with perry on the queens too...
    :rotfl:

    tec said:
    "how you set up a hive (top and bottom entrances) has a significant part in whether a queen excluder does or does not reduce a honey crop."
    a very good point tec, and i forget that beeks are not using riverbee's method of keeping, and the use of top entrances, and that there are those who use bottom entrances only, and the bees are all having to take the 'scenic route' to the honey supers...
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2012
  18. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    Hey Crazy8, Out of 12 hives I am currently using excluders on two of them. As some have said, I am just experimenting with them. I need a third as I just noticed yesterday the queen in one hive of my hives has started laying in one of my supers.:shock: