Queen in hive?

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by Dakine, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

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    It's been 38 days since I put a swarm in a box and there's still "some" activity. Not very much tho. Could there be a queen in there? I haven't gone in and tried to find her as I don't want to bother them as there isn't many bees. Someone posted it slows the recovering of the hive way down if you go in?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    There's a limit to ""not going in"". You have far exceeded that limit. Go in and see what is happening.
     

  3. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

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    I guess I'll take a peak!
     
  4. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    When you take your peek, don't try to see the queen. You want to see eggs and young larvae which will mean a queen is present and laying. The bees should be moving purposely on the frame --- no mad dashing around. If there is pollen going in and pollen being stored, brood rearing is occurring or about to occur. The empty cells in the middle of the hive should be clean and polished --- ready for the queen to lay.

    Someone is bound to say "laying workers". Worry about that after your peek. .:smile:
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    "laying workers"

    should not be a problem after 38 days normally. :D :D
     
  6. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Take some pics .I want to see what Hawaiian bees look like.
     
  7. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

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    Queen cell.jpg


    Went in to hive and found 2 large cells of some kind. Sorry not a good picture. Cells were not open. No brood or pollen in the hive. Just honey.
    Cells in middle are clean and polished. I don't think there's a queen. Laying workers???
     
  8. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Those are definately capped queen cells, your highness will arrive in a few days, and immediately destroy the competition ( other queen in unopened cell ), if you look in a day or so you will see that the workers have started to remove the wax from the tip's of the queen cells, sure sign they are hatching very soon, and when you do look in a day or so, take your time and take better photos lol.
    Barry
     
  9. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Good news Dakine.
     
  10. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

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    WOW! Thanks. I'd given up on the girls. Yeah I'll take another peak in a month or so. I'm afraid I'll hurt the queen if I go in to soon and the girls won't have anything to make another "first lady" with.

    I'd given up on feeding them but I guess I'll start feeding them 50-50 sugar water at again.

    LOL! I will take more time with my pics from now on.
     
  11. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    No need to wait a month, infact better to look snd see whats going on, whats needed. If there is a nectar flow going on they will be slow taking sugar syrup
    Barry
     
  12. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

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    Should I keep feeding them? This is the only hive I have and if I lose it it's very difficult to replace as we can't buy bees or queens here on Molokai. Can't import bees and there's not many local beekeepers here.
     
  13. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    If there is a lot of flowering plants in the area and are giving nectar, they will be very slow to take sugar syrup, feed them until they stop taking it. And you shouldn't wait a month to check the bees, many bad things can happen in 30 days. weekly or bi-weekly is fine.
    Barry
     
  14. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

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    Now that I think of it I didn't see any drones when I took a peak in the hive. Just the 2 "queens cells".
     
  15. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Someone misled you. If you open the hive calmly, don't make a ruckus by smoking too much or rough handling, the "damage" if any, is very minimal and the recovery rapid. By waiting this long, you probably did more damage because it lead to your not knowing what the needs of the hive were.
    As to the absence of drones in your hive, that is totally unimportant--other hives in the vicinity should supply them and provide for a mixture of genetic material.
     
  16. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

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    That's interesting. Do drones from other hives go hunting for "puntang" or does the queen herself go looking?
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I haven't seen this myself, but from what I learned in classes (many years ago), the virgin queens find their ways to areas where the drones from many hives congregate (in the air). Pheromones play an important part in the whole sequence of events. The drones set out after those virgin queens that enter the area and the mating takes place on the wingl It could be that my info is out of date with more recent findings being more accurate.
     
  18. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Correct, ef. Drone congregation areas, or DCAs. "" Local singles bar"" The queen flies through the group and goes home with the family jewels.
     
  19. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    But before you put your application into a colony of honeybees to be their drone of the year, understand that no matter what, by late fall your dead, if you mate it will be your first and last--if you don't mate, come late fall, early winter you will be thrown out of the colony and never again allowed to re-enter--and since you can't forage for your own food, you will starve of be chow for some other predator ..... even for a drone life isn't all that easy.
    Barry
     
  20. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

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    UPDATE!
    Well since I ]Barry] discovered the queen cells a couple days ago the bee activity has increased a LOT. I put a outside dish with sugar water and the bees are lapping it up today bigtime. Prior to today they weren't eating much at all. Now there's a couple hundred bees working on it constantly. They already went thru a few pounds and now I have to go buy more.
    Feeding bees.jpg

    I put old comb filled with simple syrup in a plate in a place close to the hive. I also put some inside a box on top the hive.
    While I'm add it. Is it better to have the sugar mixture a bit rich or lean??