Queen issues?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ndm678, May 29, 2012.

  1. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    I did a 2nd inspection this past weekend and found no eggs or larve. My eyes may not be trained enough to see an egg but i should see larve. Installed 3lb package 5/12 in a totally new hive. Inspected 5 days later and removed empty queen cage. The weather here has been rather poor, in the past 16 days we have had 5 that were sunny, the rest have been rainy or overcast. They are collecting pollen and nectar and going through the sugar water 8lbs\pints since install. They have the better part of 4frames built out, all frames have some work but none are complete. I dont know if i have an issue or just newbee jitters. any help would be greatly taken
     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    If they are building out frames, and acting queen-right (not hostile), there probably is a queen. But like you, I've got one I'm waiting and seeing on.
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Sometimes a new queen is slow to start laying, i would give her another week and if i didn't see eggs or brood i would look for her. Are you using plastic foundation? i had trouble getting them to draw out full frames when i used some plastic foundation 2 yrs. ago. Jack
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Welcome ndm678, I see this is your first post here on the forum. :hi:

    You have found a great resource here, lots of experienced keeps as well as plenty of new ones that have just gone or are going through the very same steps you are taking. Like Jack said, sometimes it takes just a little longer for things to start happening in a noticeable way.
     
  5. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    I have actually taken an established, laying queen and made up a 2-3 frame nuc with her, set it up ten feet away from the donor hive...and it sometimes takes an uncomfortable amount of time to start seeing any evidence of her laying again. So yeah, a couple weeks for a new package to settle down and get the queen laying doesn't sound like much to worry about. In the beginning, the hardest thing can be to just give it time.
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I agree with the others to an extent. It has been 17 days. I would not wait more than 10 more days. If no eggs or larva after 27 days, I would buy a queen.
     
  7. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    I'm using wax foundation, I was considering trying plastic once I get to the mediums.
     
  8. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd give it time. And my eyes have a hard time telling nectar from eggs with jelly.

    Gypsi
     
  9. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    Welcome. I've had a hard time seeing eggs as well. One thing that helped me was to take several photos of the frames and zoom into the photo once I have it downloaded onto my computer. Doing this helped me recognize eggs in the field once I found them on the computer screen. Good luck.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    again I am with Iddee here*. I myself would not allow that sort of time delay before I took corrective action. After 10 days without laying any queen is marched off to be executed here. I typically allow 3 days max for the queen to exit her introduction cage. Then a day or so to be fed up and begin laying. 10 days after I toss the package into the hive I expect to be seeing the first larvae in the hive <in poor light the eggs are hard to see and even harder if the wax is fairly new... new larvae on the other hand is not so easy to see but the glint of the whitish larval food is very easy to notice.

    *I am assuming that you are feeding something and the hive or nuc or package is not on the edge of starvation for this initial period of time.