Queen laying

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by JosephCarboni, Apr 20, 2015.

  1. JosephCarboni

    JosephCarboni New Member

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    I've been told that a queen lays her eggs in shallow comb an the bees will build the comb up around the eggs my question is will she return to the finished comb an lay more eggs when the others have emerged an the comb is fully drawn-out I'm a new beek an enjoying it so far there is so much info. an stuff to learn thanks for the input
     
  2. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Of course the queen will lay eggs in fully drawn out comb. I am NOT sure that a queen will ALWAYS lay eggs in shallow comb, but I have witnessed it in newly installed packages.
     

  3. JosephCarboni

    JosephCarboni New Member

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  4. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    Your best brood frames will be those that have raised a round or several of brood. I like the nice black ones - queens seem to lay better in them.
     
  5. JosephCarboni

    JosephCarboni New Member

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    I had one frame of old comb an all the rest was new foundation looks to me like they filled the one with comb with honey
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    When a hive is starting out and doesn't have enough built combs, there is a certain amount of competition between the queen and the workers. Each one wants to do what it does best---the queen wants to lay eggs and the workers want to store honey. In this situation, the queen will lay eggs in unfinished cells and the comb builders will complete the cells after the eggs are in them. Honey will also be stored in incompleted cells. As the hive accumulates more and more completed frames of combs, things will get sorted out and the competition will no longer be evident. The queen will lay her eggs in fully completed cells and workers will store honey in other completed cells. When a strong honey flow is on, it's vital that the beekeeper adds frames (and foundation) so that the hive will have adequate storage space. If there aren't enough built combs, the bees will start to fill honey in the area generally reserved for the queen to do her laying and that will lead to a reduction in the size of the population. The pressure can also be a factor leading the hive to swarm.
    Probably the greatest limiting factor on the success of new beekeepers is an inadequate amount of built combs to allow for advantageously manipulating the hives.