Queenless hive......again

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by ndm678, Aug 19, 2012.

  1. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    Once again, Hive #1 is queenless :mad:. I suspected her absence last week, now its confirmed, no eggs or uncapped brood, small amounts of capped brood. I noticed 5 queen cups all have larvae, all uncapped. 3 capped cells 10+ days old.
    Which brings me to my question.... What should I do with them now? Is it too late to let them finish raising the queen? Should I buy another queen? Local apiaries are running short on them. Or combine them with hive #2?
    I gave them a frame of mostly capped brood, some uncapped, some eggs, some capped honey, I planned to do this today anyway.
    I feel the best course would be to let them finish raising a queen and see where that takes me. I can help by adding frames of brood during inspections. But I'm unsure if I have enough time to let this play out. With the added frame, this hive now has 7 frames built out (4 1/2 broodnest, 1 1/2 capped sugar syrup, 1 drawn empty comb (some pollen but not much). I can't see them moving into another deep this year, especially if they raise a queen.
     
  2. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I would try doing what you did and for an added boost swap locations with a strong hive so they gain a foraging force and build up stores for winter.
     

  3. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    I took Eddy Honey's advice and swapped the hives' location today, a little after noon. Strong hive is bearding on the outside, weak hive is getting bombarded with pollen, nectar, and returning worker bees. I may have to add that 2nd deep before too long. In just an hour that deep was LOADED with bees. I'm going to continue to feed the weak hive until winter or their demise...or until someone who know what they are doing tells me different. Skipping this coming weeks inspection of the weak hive, I'll leave them alone, for now, and let the queening magic go undisturbed. After that, I will start adding a frame a week over the next few weeks.
    When would be an appropriate time to stop donating frames to this hive.
    When would be an appropriate time to further consider combining the hives, if necessary?
     
  4. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    My $.02.....If alot of groceries are coming in the front door I would stop feeding immediately. Feeding invites robbing trust me I know lol. Then you'll have a whole new set of problems to deal with.

    I just came back from Maine (Acadia) last week and there is a plethora of wildflowers in bloom especially goldenrod.

    You now have the foraging force of the strong hive; I'd say let them be bees and do what they're designed to do which is collect pollen and nectar.
     
  5. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    I'm with Eddy- remove the sugar feeder and let them pack in the really nutritious natural food instead!
     
  6. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    I left the feeder in to encourage comb building, but I will remove it.
     
  7. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    An update on my situation, for those following. I had a more experienced beek (2nd year keeping) come check out my hives. I desperately needed someone who knew what they were doing to check my operation. It was a bit earlier then I wanted to go in, but we went in none the less. We found the new queen :grin:, didn't see any eggs or uncapped brood. Still a good ammount of capped brood on the transfered frame. We assumed she wasn't mated yet. He hasn't requeened his hives and wasn't sure. They have also gone gangbusters building comb and storing honey, I have 9 frames built out, 1 frame is still completely untouched. I plan on adding another deep super later today.
    My question, because I always have one, will bee be attentive to new queen? They seem much more attentive to this one then the last couple I've had.
     
  8. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    I don't know what you mean by this. Always have one what?
    You say the bees are attentive to this queen but then you ask if they will be attentive to her?

    In any case, sounds like things are doing well. I would wait 2 weeks and then looks for new eggs and capped worker brood. If you see either then, just close it up and leave them alone for a couple of weeks between inspections. They have a lot of comb to build and stores to put in before winter- the more often you open the hive now and disturb them, the further you will set them back. Just make sure they have a laying queen 2 weeks from now, then let them build up in peace. Just my two cents. :)
     
  9. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    I always have questions, sorry, I should have worded it differently. I was wondering if they are attentive to a newly hatched or virgin queens?
     
  10. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    Oh, DUH, I should have understood that!

    That's a good question! More experienced BKs here should know the answer, I'd love to know too!....
     
  11. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Omie has more experience than me...but many times when I spot a new unmated queen she is off by herself and not being pampered. Then when she's mated it's a different story and they treat her like a queen.