Queenless Hive!

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by DannyKazzy, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. DannyKazzy

    DannyKazzy New Member

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    Hey guys I've ran into a little problem. I checked one of my hives and I've noticed them working on new queen cells and the queen is missing. It is October 21st and the days are still in the 60 and I'm kinda startled on what to do. Any suggestions
     
  2. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    If it was one of my hives, I would be thinking that it would dead over winter. In my locale there would be little chance of a new queen emerging, getting properly mated and start laying.

    I would opt for merging the queenless hive with the weakest of my other hives. I would have one less going into winter but possibly boosted the survival of the others.
     

  3. Wolfer

    Wolfer New Member

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    I hope someone local can help you out. Here in MO. I'd combine but that's a moot point as I would not know I had a problem since I pretty much don't go deep in my hives this time of year. I do my queen evaluation when I still have time to do something about it. If their up to a suitable weight I don't open till spring. If their not up to weight I feed until they are. As a general rule I still don't go into the broodnest on the off chance I'll damage the queen. Woody
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Hang on Is there anything in the queen cells. If no you probably got a queen in the hive somewhere. If yes I would consider combining with another hive and splitting in the spring
     
  5. DannyKazzy

    DannyKazzy New Member

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    What if I put like a screen from the windows between a week hive and this hive and have two exits for each hive as one and see off the queen hatches and mates and if the cold attacks I can take out the screen and the two hives will combine together from both of them being as one hive same scent anyone knows where I'm going with this??
     
  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    you may be mixing pheremons from 2 diferent queens if both have queens. I think there will be fighting between the screens. I would back up and verify if there is anything in the queen cups before doing anything
     
  7. DannyKazzy

    DannyKazzy New Member

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    Sorry I guess I wasn't specific enough the queens are almost capped the cells I mean are almost capped and there is baby queens in the process
     
  8. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    My wife was just visiting in Boston, she said the weather was unseasonably warm. Are there any drones left in your hives? You might make it yet, however, the queens won't be making their mating flights for at least one more week, and by them it will likely be too cool. Even if a queen makes it, she might be of inferior quality. Personally I think it makes sense to winter a nice strong hive and split in the spring.
     
  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    find out if the queen cells are occupied, and do you have 1 to 3 day old brood. You are not necessarily queenless.
    If you are, having tried to mate one in Texas last fall, may I suggest a newspaper combine. But first check queen cells for larva and check for eggs and 1 to 3 day larva.
     
  10. DannyKazzy

    DannyKazzy New Member

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    the Queen cells are occupied. They are almost closes up I'm just thinking of just combining it with a smaller hive
     
  11. Ray

    Ray Member

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    It take 16 days, from laid egg to hatched queen.
    That means you had a queen, alive and well, less than 16 days ago.
    How much empty comb is in the hive? How much open brood?
    Are the queen cells SWARM cells? Usually made on the bottom of the frames.
    The first virgin queen born will kill the other queens (most of the time),
    so there probably isn't a virgin running around YET.

    I would look for the queen again!

    If you combine the two hives, and there is a queen in both hives, it won't be pretty!
     
  12. DannyKazzy

    DannyKazzy New Member

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    Well you do have a good point one thing startled me is that some of the queen cells were on the bottom aka swarm cells on one side and the others were in the middle of the frame There is quite a few open broodsAnd I'll check today one more time for the queen ill give some syrup today if I don't find the queen and check tomorrow maybe she isn't just laying or something. Ill just hope for the best cause I have two hives as I'm speaking that the queens are suppose to start laying and one is not the strongest hive cause its been lacking on the queen, while the other is about the same size as this hive that I checked yesterday.
     
  13. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I will be following this. But how about stacking the 2 hives double screens between, after being sure this one has no living queen? OR removing the queen cells once capped to a nice safe little nuc with some food and brood and nurse bees, then doing the combine or stacking? I still have warm weather here, please take my suggestions with a hefty grain of salt, but I'd sure hate to see you have a queen fight and lose 2 mated queens.
     
  14. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    That is odd this time of year. If your able can you post some pics when you do your inspection. If you are indeed queenless I would combine hives
     
  15. DannyKazzy

    DannyKazzy New Member

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    Well I was thinking of stacking them together let the queenless one a chance with hatching a new queen and if al fails ill just pull out the screen and combine the hives


    Or should I try the Nuc way choices I don't wanna give up on the queen cells but yet I'm kinda worried of loosing the strong hive
     
  16. DannyKazzy

    DannyKazzy New Member

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    ill try to snap some pictures today on my inspection
     
  17. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Its Late October your looking at a week or 2 into November before a mating flight. In Massachussetts I would venture to guess the queen will not get properly mated if she is even able to go on a mating flight at all.
     
  18. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    the trouble with virgin queens in winter is will they live til spring to mate, but I think a queen cell in a nuc is better than none, and with brood, winterbees have to last all winter anyway.

    Stacking is how I decided whether to combine 2 weak hives last year, and by the time I removed the screens there was no fighting. Same procedure as moving a hive, must do at night or in early morning and stuff something in entrance so bees know to re-orient on departure. And double screening whether window or #8 hardware cloth, on a wooden frame (piece-o-cake with 1x2 4 nails and a staple gun) Entrances face opposite direction and robber guards or small entrances are still a necessity anytime you have a weak hive.
     
  19. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I'm with RR, i would remove all queen cells,go through the hive again to make sure there is no queen and newspaper combine. As for a virgin queen mating next spring, unless i've been miss informed, a virgin queen only has about 8 days to breed or she will be unfertil?? Jack
     
  20. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    That is correct brooks a queen has a small window in which to breed. The only option this late would be to combine if you are queenless. I am wondering how this hive went queenless this late unless the queen was accidently killed during an inspection.