Queenrite test?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Bsweet, Aug 22, 2011.

  1. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    So we all know that if we put a second queen in a queenrite hive that it results in a small mob rush on the new one.

    So if we have a hive that we suspect is queenless, and we are lucky to have some queen juice, can we put a sample in a empty queen cage and set it on top of the frames and get a reaction?

    Reaction # 1 a mob rush/balling of the cage thus indicating a queen or laying worker(if we waited to long)

    Reaction # 2 a friendly rush to the cage like OMG its a queen.

    Or am I puffing an empty unlit smoker?
    Jim
     
  2. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    Were I suspicious about whether a colony were queenright or not, I'd get a frame of eggs and stick it in the hive and check it three days later for emergency queen cells.

    Juice I don't know about.
     

  3. Bsweet

    Bsweet Member

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    Thats why I wondered about the juice, might find out today/right now not in three days. Just my brain doing that BB in a boxcar thing. Jim
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I not sure about this theory. If you think about it even in a queenless hive the queen cage is used to introduce the new queen over time to keep her from being rejected. So Im thinking that you will not gain much by using an empty cage with a pheromone. About the best idea is as sqkcrk suggested a frame of egg is about the best way.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I really think your idea should work Jim. it might require some refinement to discriminate the yeas from the nays... but what doesn't.

    I base this speculation on two things... 1) even a fairly dated introduction cage (with no queen for weeks) will get some attention from a hive that has been queenless for a while (2 days + or so) and 2) although he used mated queens and not pheromones one commercial bee keeper described to me about the same process in making up nucs and then determining where the old queens resided.
     
  6. Bee n There

    Bee n There New Member

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    I sort of tried this last week by placing and old queen I was pulling out of one hive in a cage on the doorstep of another queenrite hive. They balled up on the cage in just a few min so I suspect it might not be clear cut. Perhaps though, a queenless hive will react quicker or to a greater extent?