question about a swarm that filled up 2 deeps/ still feeding

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by adamant, May 19, 2012.

  1. adamant

    adamant Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Got a swarm and in 1 week it filled 1 10 frame deep. 2 weeks latter it filled another deep. I am still feeding it. So I put a medium honey super on it and I was thinking, I don't want sugar honey ! Should I pull the feeder?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You should have pulled the feeder when you added the second deep.
     

  3. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've been feeding my second deep. I was going to quit feeding when I added the next box (medium). I checked this afternoon and there is at least partial comb on 7 frames in the second deep. At their rate so far, I'm expecting the girls to have it full by the end of May. So... have I screwed up by feeding the second deep?
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    NO, just wasted money.
     
  5. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    When I checked today, the queen had moved up into the second box. Will she stay there, or will she go back down?
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Depends on the flow. The honey will go above the brood, ALWAYS. If not enough honey, she moves up.If enough honey, it fills the top and she moves down. TOO much honey and she will move down and out. ""swarm"" That's why you keep expansion room in a hive at all times during a flow.
     
  7. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

    Messages:
    2,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My feral hives are impressing the heck out of me too! I checked on my feral hive I caught on mother's day. In six days they have filled 7 frames and looked crowded. I added another deep (I left syrup bag in for them to feed on...guess I will chuck it when they are done this round). My packaged bees from way back on April 3 are still on 4-5 frames.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    rather than say feeding the swarm was a waste I would suggest that 'context and situation' may or may not warrant feeding.

    for example a large swarm can use a lot of resources... so if you just placed them into a box and suddenly the weather turned off cold and wet with little sunshine in between episodes then feeding is likely to be essential.

    for example if the 'equipment' you placed the large swarm into had almost no drawn comb and the only thing you had was frames and foundation then the feed you are adding is not only providing a pantry for the hive to get thru the bad times but is also getting wax drawn and fairly quickly. for almost all beekeeper (all that I can think of anyway) drawn comb has value beyond the components of wood frame, wire and foundation. <on occasions I have fed just to get this job done.

    however somewhat in the mode of thinking of Iddee most times I tell folks that are starting from packages, nucs or swarms to feed until you have one box of bee (with some heft to the box itself).
     
  9. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    swarm catch  5 12 12.JPG
    My captured swarm from 7 days ago has 6-1/2 deep frames fully drawn. I never fed them and they started on new foundation.
     
  10. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

    Messages:
    2,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That's an awesome amount of bees!
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    EddyHoney said: " I never fed them and they started on new foundation."
    Efmesch says: I'm sure I'm bucking the current on this one, but I love to here words like Edie's. I understand that feeding is necessary when you need to have the bees build combs and there isn't a honey flow going on. But I've been reading what seems to me like too many reports of unnecessary feeding. What bothers me in particular isn't the "wasted money" but the excess of unnecessary syrup floating around the hives. I wonder how much of it gets mixed in with the harvested honey (even if it isn't intentional). I try to avoid feeding syrup to the extreme. On the rare occasions when I do feed, it is almost exclusively honey that I give back to the bees.
     
  12. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We got a package of bees with a Wayne's queen last weekend. We talked about it being a bit late in the season to start a package, but we put them on three pulled combs we had stored in the freezer. We hived the package Saturday, they were really a good strong package and good number of honey bees... I thought about it all night in my sleep or lack there of..(I felt the were definitely stressed, squished in three frames, their new queen is in a box) and resources were minimal. Then the forecast called for rain the following 3 days...
    First question I asked Steve (before coffee and his eyes open) How many frames of honey in the freezer on shallows... I got the 'look' and checked myself! 3 capped frames... The yard was still in a tizzy at 7am...flying 30 foot circles round and round for 12 hours! They were still not settling in and they probably knew the forecast better than us.
    I not only added the 7 more frames with foundation to the deep, but added the shallow on top with the 3 frames of honey and 7 new foundation....I know this isn't by the book, and I know they will stove pipe - but they needed resources with the three days of heavy rain and the queen still in her cage....The entire yard was calm within 10 minutes! I will deal with the stove pipe issue later, but they needed quick food.
    The queen was just about out, (quick peek) on Tuesday (all but her body) so we released her onto the frame... one week and one day now...and today they are bringing in Pollen!!! Yahoo! :yahoo:I found it best to go with my best educated gut feeling. I thought to keep them tight like when I started the other split... not these ladies... They wanted space and food. I spend plenty of time watching them...sometimes I make a wrong call, they let me know...but when I make the right call they show joy almost immediately..Awesome package though, and last I knew Larry still had more Wayne's queens...
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    efmesch writes:
    I'm sure I'm bucking the current on this one, but I love to here words like Edie's. I understand that feeding is necessary when you need to have the bees build combs and there isn't a honey flow going on.

    tecumseh:
    nothing wrong with confronting any existing way of thinking and I for one certainly do not disagree with your sentiments. not so long ago I made comments (in the virtual world and in public) in regards to feeding only because it seemed a lot of new beekeeper though you should be able to (in any location and at any time) set a package of bees out and they would certainly make a living all by themselves without any human assistance. then a bit later I realized that new bee keeper who are unable to recognize the context of their own situation took this idea a bit overboard... essentially creating hives that never need to fly since they had a syrup bucket right there in the hive... and on occasions feeding so heavily that they created their own human induced swarming situation. as Iddee has suggested feeding is not cheap and at some time not necessary.... hopefully some folks have come to understand that feeding like almost all things needs to be approached with boundaries firmly in mind.

    a commercial beekeeper/queen rearing acquaintance of mine coined it best (partially I think) when in regards to feeding queen rearing units told me... 'think trickle and not pour'... and to this I will add that new beekeeper need to add the context of the situation to determine if trickle is even necessary.
     
  14. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The bees show what food source they prefer, while I almost always provide sugar syrup for new packages, to drawn out combs, if there is a strong nectar on, they will largely ignore syrup, tending to it between nectar flows ( during the course of a day several plants will have a cycle as to when they produce both pollen AND nectar but not necessarily both, is why the brood may appear to be plugged full of pollen in much larger band then nectar/ honey, honey being stored in the upper corners, and relatively narrow band across the top, with wider band of pollen.
    Barry