Question about crush and strain honey from a cutout.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Mar 25, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Did that cutout yesterday. Oh what a surprise we got. I will start a thread later with a little video. A hint, it was 2 for 1 Sunday.

    Anyway.

    I crushed about 7 gallons of honey last night. I filtered just one jar. It looks like mud. Can not see light through it.

    Is it good to eat and can I get it any clearer by filtering more.

    2013-03-25_09-56-08_617.jpg
     
  2. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    Howdy Yankee11. Very cool. I would think you could filter it and it would look and perhaps taste better - as long as you know there was no larva in it when crushed.
     

  3. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Only crushed what was capped.

    This hive was very old. Comb was very, very dark. Hone kinda smells fermented, but isn't honey fermented? Tastes like peaches.
     
  4. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Are you sure you didn't include a bunch of capped larvae in that?
    If the comb was black and leathery, it was used a lot for brood raising, and will include many layers of old cocoons in the cells when crushed.
    To be honest, it seems totally unappetizing to me, but at the very least I'd strain it super well maybe through a fine paint straining cloth, and then see what it looks like.
    Maybe you could use it for bee feed? It'd be very nutritious for the bees, and free.
     
  5. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    What I crushed was not brood. This was above the brood nest. I think it was a very old colony.

    This was the empty comb and a little brood that we didn't have room for. The whole hive was dark like this.

    2013-03-25_12-32-16_208.jpg

    It may become bee food. Not sure yet. Doesn't look appetizing to me right now. The comb was kinda hard and brittle. But was full of honey. The video will show more.
     
  6. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Strain through a 200 micron filter, heat up a box or small space to help it filter through, it will take time....
    cheapest place for these bucket filters is US plastics.
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Heat. Use a 60 watt trouble light in a super and place a queen excluder on top to support the pail and place supers and cover to keep the heat in. once the honey is 90 deg skim the light material and wax off the surface then poor the honey thru a filter. pour slowly and watch for sediment in the bottom that it doesn't get sturd up. Keep the honey warm for a few days and the partials will float or settle once it is free of partials and in jars set the jars on the window ledge in the sun for a few days and let the sun bleach and clear the honey.
     
  8. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    So a 200 micron filter is sufficient? Nothitng to be concerned about with the age of the hive. Dark comb, etc.
     
  9. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    The filter could be finer but the honey is stained by the [FONT=&amp]propolis [/FONT] that the bees use to polish and sterilize the cells prior to the queen relaying. One way would be to feed the honey back to the bees and let them restore and save it again and extract it latter. You could be introducing brood disease into your hive by doing so. In most old comb there is some disease spores that have been contained and covered by [FONT=&amp]propolis, stirring the honey in with the brood comb could release these and feeding it back could infect your colonies.[/FONT] When I started keeping bees If was emphasized to never feed back honey to bees unless you knew where it came from.
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I think you should get rid of it. As soon as you get it packed up, I'll send you my address. My kitchen table has room for it.