Question about feeding and treatment for pests.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Yvonne, Oct 23, 2011.

  1. Yvonne

    Yvonne New Member

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    I'm new to bee keeping, had to learn fast after my fathers death in March. 7 hives at first, 5 new hives added after swarming in spring, all thriving and doing well. All have full supers for winter. :Dancing: About feeding- should I feed our bees and if so what? I have seen certain bee suppliments/feedings offered on bee supply sites.
    As far as preventive treatment for pests/disease, how often should we treat them. I know my father treated them in the fall . We have treated them this fall as Daddy did not treat them last year. Any suggestions and hints appreciated. :confused:
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    #1... Feed sugar water when needed only. If they have 50 lb. of honey or more, do not feed. If they need, mix 2 parts sugar and 1 part water. You must heat the water to get that much sugar to dissolve in it.

    One pint sugar equals 1 LB.
    2:1 can be pints or lbs. or one and the other. Doesn't matter.

    Treat only if needed. Do a search on mite counts, sugar shake, and mite drop. It will tell you different ways to check for mites.

    You may want to feed fumigillin-b for nosema as a preventative, but all other treatments should not be done as a preventative, only as a needed treatment.
     

  3. Yvonne

    Yvonne New Member

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    Thank you much for the reply!!!! Our bees should have plenty for winter, so looks like we're set. Will only treat when needed now. As I said , Daddy didn't treat last year and after talking with my mother, it has been a while since he did. He lost several hives a few years ago, not sure cause. I do know he treated for mites at one time. We decided to treat them this year as we found 1 hive dead late in spring/early summer. Not sure why, brood hive with wax moth evidence but with only minimal if any a larva found. How long the hive had been dead we are not sure. I just noticed large amount of dead bees in front, may have been weak hive with no queen. It was one of the original hives.
    Am writing down the instructions for feeding mixture in case needed. Am enjoying the site. Lot of much needed info on here. Thanks again!!!! :thumbsup: :wave:
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Yvonne writes:
    We decided to treat them this year as we found 1 hive dead late in spring/early summer. Not sure why, brood hive with wax moth evidence but with only minimal if any a larva found. How long the hive had been dead we are not sure. I just noticed large amount of dead bees in front, may have been weak hive with no queen.

    tecumseh:
    in the summer months the wax moth will take over a poorly populated hive fairly quick and reduce it to a mess in an extremely short period of time. it is quite common to see the end game of varroa on a well established hive in the late summer months.

    feeding.... as an old welder explained to me at one point in my life... we ain't makin' clocks here. feeding sugar water is not like makin' clocks either. 2 to 1 or 1 to 1 and some mixes less that 1 to 1 will work just fine in most of the southern US. Ideally 1 to 1 builds brood and 2 to 1 builds weight.